Commands tagged ESC (1)

  • Pressing ESC then * will insert in the command line the results of the autocompletion. It's hard to explain but if you look the sample output or do echo ESC * you will understand quickly. By the way, few reminders about ESC : - Hold ESC does the same thing as tab tab - 'ESC .' inserts the last argument of last command (can be done many times in order to get the last argument of all previous commands) Show Sample Output


    65
    ESC *
    Josay · 2009-06-14 21:17:40 18

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