Commands tagged release (3)

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Check if you work on a virtual/physical machine in Linux
Command used to know if we are working on a virtual or physical machine. This command will use the dmidecode utility to retrieve hardware information of your computer via the BIOS. Run this command as root or with sudo.

find files in a date range
Find files in a specific date range - in this case, the first half of last year. -newermt = modification time of the file is more recent than this date GNU find allows any date specfication that GNU date would accept, e.g. $ find . -type f -newermt "3 years ago" ! -newermt "2 years ago" or $ find . -type f -newermt "last monday"

Colored SVN diff
Simple way to achieve a colored SVN diff

Output entire line once per unique value of the first column
Removes duplicates in the specified field/column while outputting entire lines. An elegant command for processing tab (or otherwise) delimited data.

Rapidly invoke an editor to write a long, complex, or tricky command
Next time you are using your shell, try typing $ ctrl-x ctrl-e # in emacs mode or $ v # in vi mode The shell will take what you've written on the command line thus far and paste it into the editor specified by $EDITOR. Then you can edit at leisure using all the powerful macros and commands of vi, emacs, nano, or whatever.

Display list of available printers

Mouse Tracking
Will track your mouse and save it to a file. You can use gnuplot to graph it: $ gnuplot -persist

Waste time for about 3 minutes
If you're a slow reader and/or you like to ponder, adjust the sleep time to be longer

list files recursively by size

Simulate typing
This will output the characters at 10 per second.


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