Commands tagged last, modfiied (3)


  • 2
    ls -t1 | head -n1
    neW1 · 2009-02-26 09:12:36 1
  • Sorts by latest modified files by looking to current directory and all subdirectories Show Sample Output


    1
    find . -name '*pdf*' -print0 | xargs -0 ls -lt | head -20
    fuats · 2013-10-03 21:58:51 0
  • This command line assumes that "${url}" is the URL of the web resource. It can be useful to check the "freshness" of a download URL before a GET request. Show Sample Output


    1
    curl --silent --head "${url}" | grep 'Last-Modified:' | cut -c 16- | date -f - +'%s'
    odoepner · 2016-06-02 22:20:55 0

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