Commands tagged latex (9)

  • This is an example of the usage of pdfnup (you can find it in the 'pdfjam' package). With this command you can save ink/toner and paper (and thus trees!) when you print a pdf. This tools are very configurable, and you can make also 2x2, 3x2, 2x3 layouts, and more (the limit is your fantasy and the resolution of the printer :-) You must have installed pdfjam, pdflatex, and the LaTeX pdfpages package in your box. Show Sample Output


    3
    pdfnup --nup 2x1 --frame true --landscape --outfile output.pdf input.pdf
    TetsuyO · 2010-12-21 14:20:06 0
  • If the pdf/dvi/etc documentation for a latex package is already part of your local texmf tree, then texdoc will find and display it for you. If the documentation is not available on your system, it will bring up the package's webpage at CTAN to help you investigate. Show Sample Output


    2
    texdoc packagename
    bwoodacre · 2010-05-23 20:02:32 0

  • 1
    grep -R usepackage * | cut -d']' -f2 | cut -s -d'{' -f 2 | sed s/"}"/.sty"}"/g | cut -d'}' -f1 | sort | uniq | xargs dpkg -S | cut -d':' -f1 | sort | uniq
    prayer · 2010-05-22 19:37:26 1

  • 1
    dwdiff -c a.tex b.tex | less -R
    fubunny · 2011-07-27 15:24:35 1
  • It is often recommended to enclose capital letters in a BibTeX file in braces, so the letters will not be transformed to lower case, when imported from LaTeX. This is an attempt to apply this rule to a BibTeX database file. DO NOT USE sed '...' input.bib > input.bib as it will empty the file! How it works: /^\s*[^@%]/ Apply the search-and-replace rule to lines that start (^) with zero or more white spaces (\s*), followed by any character ([...]) that is *NOT* a "@" or a "%" (^@%). s=<some stuff>=<other stuff>=g Search (s) for some stuff and replace by other stuff. Do that globally (g) for all matches in each processed line. \([A-Z][A-Z]*\)\([^}A-Z]\|},$\) Matches at least one uppercase letter ([A-Z][A-Z]*) followed by a character that is EITHER not "}" and not a capital letter ([^}A-Z]) OR (|) it actually IS a "}", which is followed by "," at the end of the line ($). Putting regular expressions in escaped parentheses (\( and \), respectively) allows to dereference the matched string later. {\1}\2 Replace the matched string by "{", followed by part 1 of the matched string (\1), followed by "}", followed by the second part of the matched string (\2). I tried this with GNU sed, only, version 4.2.1. Show Sample Output


    1
    sed '/^\s*[^@%]/s=\([A-Z][A-Z]*\)\([^}A-Z]\|},$\)={\1}\2=g' literature.bib > output.bib
    michelsberg · 2013-01-15 22:24:17 2
  • LaTeX is not a smart compiler - You need to run it several times to make it back-patch all the missing refs. The message if to do so or not is buried in its endless output and the log file. This grep lines helps to find it.


    0
    egrep "(There were undefined references|Rerun to get (cross-references|the bars) right)" texfile.log
    gwiener · 2009-07-07 06:48:03 1
  • kpsewhich is a tool for path and file lookup. It is a front-end of the kpathsea library. For one or more given package or file names it returns the complete path from within the TeX installation, that one which the compiler would actually use. Via backticks we can use it as argument to less, more, or any editor. For example: gedit `kpsewhich hyperref.sty` Show Sample Output


    0
    less `kpsewhich scrartcl.cls`
    Stefan · 2012-04-15 11:10:41 0
  • Uses zsh globbing syntax to safely remove all the files known to be generated by LaTeX, but only if there is actually a .tex source file with the same basename present. So we don't accidentally delete a .nav .log or .out file that has nothing to do with LaTeX, e/'[[ -f ${REPLY:r}.tex ]]'/ actually checks for the existance of a .tex file of the same name, beforehand. A different way to do this, would be to glob all *.tex files and generate a globbing pattern from them: TEXTEMPFILES=(*.tex(.N:s/%tex/'(log|toc|aux|nav|snm|out|tex.backup|bbl|blg|bib.backup|vrb|lof|lot|hd|idx)(.N)'/)) ; rm -v ${~TEXTEMPFILES} or, you could use purge() from grml-etc-core ( http://github.com/grml/grml-etc-core/blob/master/usr_share_grml/zsh/functions/purge )


    0
    rm -v *.(log|toc|aux|nav|snm|out|tex.backup|bbl|blg|bib.backup|vrb|lof|lot|hd|idx)(.e/'[[ -f ${REPLY:r}.tex ]]'/)
    xro · 2012-09-18 20:49:28 0
  • List all font names installed in the system. Useful for TeX. Show Sample Output


    0
    fc-list | cut -d':' -f2 | sort -u
    smarx · 2015-12-29 12:23:11 0

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