Commands tagged xclip (9)

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Calculate days on which Friday the 13th occurs (inspired from the work of the user justsomeguy)
Friday is the 5th day of the week, monday is the 1st. Output may be affected by locale.

Find the package that installed a command

A very simple and useful stopwatch
time read -sn1 (s:silent, n:number of characters. Press any character to stop)

Edit 2 or more files in vim using vim -d
Is this not the same

Puts every word from a file into a new line
Basically it creates a typical word list file from any normal text.

Given a file path, unplug the USB device on which the file is located (the file must be on an USB device !)
You have an external USB drive or key. Apply this command (using the file path of anything on your device) and it will simulate the unplug of this device. If you just want the port, just type : echo $(sudo lshw -businfo | grep -B 1 -m 1 $(df "/path/to/file" | tail -1 | awk '{print $1}' | cut -c 6-8) | head -n 1 | awk '{print $1}' | cut -c 5- | tr ":" "-")

Run a command for blocks of output of another command
The given example collects output of the tail command: Whenever a line is emitted, further lines are collected, until no more output comes for one second. This group of lines is then sent as notification to the user. You can test the example with $ logger "First group"; sleep 1; logger "Second"; logger "group"

Given process ID print its environment variables

Calculate md5 sums for every file in a directory tree

FInd the 10 biggest files taking up disk space
Often you need to find the files that are taking up the most disk space in order to free up space asap. This script can be run on the enitre filesystem as root or on a home directory to find the largest files.


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