Commands tagged pkill (4)

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Follow a new friend on twitter
replace username, password, and nameofnewfriend with proper values. Remember to escape things like ! or & in your password

list processes with established tcp connections (without netstat)
Uses lsof to list open network connections (file descriptors), grepping for only those in an established state

Find unused IPs on a given subnet

Using bash inline
There are two ways to use "here documents" with bash to fill stdin: The following example shows use with the "bc" command. a) Using a delimiter at the end of data: $ less-than less-than eeooff bc > k=1024 > m=k*k > g=k*m > g > eeooff 1073741824 b) using the "inline" verion with three less-than symbols: $ less-than less-than less-than "k=1024; m=k*k; g=k*m; g" bc 1073741824 One nice advantage of using the triple less-than version is that the command can easily be recalled from command line history and re-executed. PS: in this "description", I had to use the name "less-than" to represent the less-than symbol because the commandlinefu input text box seems to eat up the real less-than symbols. Odd.

Create a file of repeated, non-zero
dd can be used with /dev/zero to easily create a file of all zero-bytes. Pipe that through tr and use octal conversions to change the byte values from zero to 0xff (octal 0377). You can replace 0377 with the byte of your choice. You can also use \\0 and \\377 instead of the quoted version.

delete all leading and trailing whitespace from each line in file

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Duplicating service runlevel configurations from one server to another.
And then to complete the task: Go to target host; $ssh host Turn everything off: $for i in `chkconfig --list | fgrep :on | awk '{print $1}'` ; do chkconfig --level 12345 $i off; done Create duplicate config: $while read line; do chkconfig --level $line on; done < foo

Picture Renamer

See a full list of compiler defined symbols
From http://lists.debian.org/debian-devel/2001/01/msg00971.html .


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