Commands tagged clear (5)

  • The above code is just an example of printing on the same line, hit Ctrl + C to stop When using echo -ne "something\r", echo will: - print "something" - dont print a new line (-n) - interpret \r as carriage return, going back to the start of the line (-e) Remember to print some white spaces after the output if your command will print lines of different sizes, mainly if one line will be smaller than the previous Edit from reading comments: You can achieve the same effect using printf (more standardized than echo): while true; do printf "%-80s\r" "$(date)"; sleep 1; done


    12
    while true; do echo -ne "$(date)\r"; sleep 1; done
    polaco · 2009-11-17 22:45:37 7
  • While going through the source code for the well known ps command, I read about some interesting things.. Namely, that there are a bunch of different fields that ps can try and enumerate for you. These are fields I was not able to find in the man pages, documentation, only in the source. Here is a longer function that goes through each of the formats recognized by the ps on your machine, executes it, and then prompts you whether you would like to add it or not. Adding it simply adds it to an array that is then printed when you ctrl-c or at the end of the function run. This lets you save your favorite ones and then see the command to put in your .bash_profile like mine at : http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html Note that I had to do the exec method below in order to pause with read. t () { local r l a P f=/tmp/ps c='command ps wwo pid:6,user:8,vsize:8,comm:20' IFS=' '; trap 'exec 66 exec 66 $f && command ps L | tr -s ' ' >&$f; while read -u66 l >&/dev/null; do a=${l/% */}; $c,$a k -${a//%/} -A; yn "Add $a" && P[$SECONDS]=$a; done } Show Sample Output


    2
    for p in `ps L|cut -d' ' -f1`;do echo -e "`tput clear;read -p$p -n1 p`";ps wwo pid:6,user:8,comm:10,$p kpid -A;done
    AskApache · 2010-10-12 06:42:10 4
  • awk can clear the screen while displaying output. This is a handy way of seeing how many lines a tail -f has hit or see how many files find has found. On solaris, you may have to use 'nawk' and your machine needs 'tput' Show Sample Output


    0
    cat /dev/urandom|awk 'BEGIN{"tput cuu1" | getline CursorUp; "tput clear" | getline Clear; printf Clear}{num+=1;printf CursorUp; print num}'
    axelabs · 2009-07-13 07:30:51 0
  • Clear the screen and list file


    0
    alias cls='clear;ls'
    opexxx · 2013-03-19 12:18:47 3
  • This will clear Mac OS's DNS cache, which has been a source of issues for me in the past.


    0
    sudo dscacheutil -flushcache; sudo killall -HUP mDNSResponder
    abeardevil · 2017-02-24 18:34:49 4

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Coping files, excluding certain files
Preserve file structure when coping and exclude some file o dir patterns

Mostly silent FLAC checking (only errors are displayed)
FLAC's built in integrity checks are far more useful then devising a scheme to use MD5 sum files. This will check all the FLAC in a directory and output only errors. Remove the "s" after the "t" and it will be somewhat verbose in the check.

Find C/C++ source code comments
This is a naive way of finding source code comments in source code files that use C-like comments: // and /*...*/

Diff two directories by finding and comparing the md5 checksums of their contents.
Compute the md5 checksums for the contents of two mirrored directories, then sort and diff the results. If everything matches, nothing is returned. Otherwise, any checksums which do not match, or which exist in one tree but not the other, are returned. As you might imagine, the output is useful only if no errors are found, because only the checksums, not filenames, are returned. I hope to address this, or that someone else will!

Get all files of particular type (say, PDF) listed on some wegpage (say, example.com)
This example command fetches 'example.com' webpage and then fetches+saves all PDF files listed (linked to) on that webpage. [*Note: of course there are no PDFs on example.com. This is just an example]

Join a folder full of split files
If you use newsgroups then you'll have come across split files before. Joining together a whole batch of them can be a pain so this will do the whole folder in one.

Update all Docker Images

Remove all but one specific file

set history file length
set how many commands to keep in history Default is 500 Saved in /home/$USER/.bash_history Add this to /home/$USER/.bashrc HISTFILESIZE=1000000000 HISTSIZE=1000000

Get a funny one-liner from www.onelinerz.net
Put this command in .bashrc and every time you open a new terminal a random quote will be downloaded and printed from onelinerz.net. By altering the URL in the w3m statement you can change the output: 1 to 10 lines - http://www.onelinerz.net/random-one-liners/(number)/ 20 newest lines - http://www.onelinerz.net/latest-one-liners/ Top 10 lines - http://www.onelinerz.net/top-100-funny-one-liners/ Top 10 lines are updated daily.


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