Commands tagged compress (10)

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Creat a tar file for backup info
Use tar command for a backup info with a date of creation

Summary of disk usage, excluding other filesystems, summarised and sorted by size
This command is useful for finding out which directories below the current location use the most space. It is summarised by directory and excludes mounted filesystems. Finally it is sorted by size.

List of computers not logged into in more than four weeks

Set a Reminder for yourself via the notification system
This will be seen through your system's visual notification system, notify-osd, notification-daemon, etc. --- sleep accepts s,m,h,d and floats (date; sleep .25m; date) --- notify-send (-t is in milliseconds && -u low / normal / critical) man notify-send for more information --- notification-daemon can use b/i/u/a HTML

Make sudo forget password instantly
By default sudo 'remembers' password for a few minutes, so that you do not need to re-enter password for a series of sudo commands that might follow within a short time duration. However, sometime you might want sudo to instantly 'forget' the password. (Next sudo command will need you to reenter the password) Credit: I first learned this while listening to one of the 'tuxradar' podcast.

Determine space taken by files of certain type
Just how much space are those zillions of database logs taking up ? How much will you gain on a compression rate of say 80% ? This little line gives you a good start for your calculations.

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

Quick case-insenstive partial filename search
This is a simple command, but extremely useful. It's a quick way to search the file names in the current directory for a substring. Normally people use "ls *term*" but that requires the stars and is not case insensitive. Color (for both ls and grep) is an added bonus.

LIst svn commits by user for a date range
Outputs a quick summary of the svn commits for a user over a date range with the detail revision logs including comments and files affected. Useful for searching for a particular change or reporting by user.

List all accessed configuration files while executing a program in linux terminal (improved version)
Last listed files presumably have higher precedency then files listed first, i.e. configuration files in the personal .config directory will be listed last and their config parameters will be more authoritative then default config parameters defined in /etc directory which are usually listed above them. If you replace ".conf" with ".ini" in the command, initial files will be listed instead of config files. If you do not like to list multiple access to the same config file, pipe to "uniq" or "uniq -c" to prefix lines by the number of occurrences


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