Commands tagged installed packages (2)

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grep processes list avoiding the grep itself
Trick to avoid the form: grep process | grep - v grep

Propagate a directory to another and create symlink to content
Lndir create from source directory to destination directory a full symlink tree of all contents of source directory, really useful for propagate changes from a directory to another.

Backup all mysql databases to individual files on a remote server
It grabs all the database names granted for the $MYSQLUSER and gzip them to a remote host via SSH.

Should I be sleeping?

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

check open ports without netstat or lsof

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

Google Spell Checker
I took matthewbauer's cool one-liner and rewrote it as a shell function that returns all the suggestions or outputs "OK" if it doesn't find anything wrong. It should work on ksh, zsh, and bash. Users that don't have tee can leave that part off like this: $spellcheck(){ typeset y=$@;curl -sd "$y" https://google.com/tbproxy/spell|sed -n '/s="[1-9]"/{s/]*>/ /g;s/\t/ /g;s/ *\(.*\)/Suggestions: \1\n/g;p}';}

Print a row of characters across the terminal
Print a row of characters across the terminal. Uses tput to establish the current terminal width, and generates a line of characters just long enough to cross it. In the example '#' is used. It's possible to use a repeating sequence by dividing the columns by the number of characters in the sequence like this: $ seq -s'~-' 0 $(( $(tput cols) /2 )) | tr -d '[:digit:]' or $ seq -s'-~?' 0 $(( $(tput cols) /3 )) | tr -d '[:digit:]' You will lose chararacters at the end if the length isn't cleanly divisible.

Show when filesystem was created
Knowing when a filesystem is created , you can deduce when an operating system was installed . find filesystem device (/dev/) informations by using the cat /etc/fstab command.


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