Commands tagged pbcopy (5)

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Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Show linux kernel modules dependencies
Use modprobe to list all the dependencies of a certain kernel module. Handy when debugging system issues.

Deleting Files from svn which are missing

Show all available colors on your terminal.
Using perl and tput, show all the colors with numbers that your actual $TERM can handle. If want to remove the numbers at beginning of new line, it should be something like this: $perl -E 'say `tput setb $_`," "x `tput cols`, `tput sgr0` for 0 .. (`tput colors` - 1)'

Revert an SVN file to previous revision
M - current revision, N - older revision

Make shell (script) low priority. Use for non interactive tasks

Delay execution until load average falls under 1.5
If shell escaping of the command is problematic, you can write the command to a file first: $ batch

Force GNU/Linux keyboard settings, layout and configuration
Bash snippet to force GNU/Linux keyboard settings, layout and configuration. Usefull when some GNU/Linux distributions such as *Ubuntu's store only limited configation options due to demonstration purposes on LiveUSB or Live persistent devices. Overcomes the English QWERTY to French AZERTY settings failure. Code bash en ligne de commande pour forcer l'adoption du clavier AZERTY sur les cl? USB bootable en Ubuntu.

Advanced LS Output using Find for Formatted/Sortable File Stat info
I love this function because it tells me everything I want to know about files, more than stat, more than ls. It's very useful and infinitely expandable. $ find $PWD -maxdepth 1 -printf '%.5m %10M %#9u:%-9g %#5U:%-5G [%AD | %TD | %CD] [%Y] %p\n' | sort -rgbS 50% 00761 drwxrw---x askapache:askapache 777:666 [06/10/10 | 06/10/10 | 06/10/10] [d] /web/cg/tmp The key is: # -printf '%.5m %10M %#9u:%-9g %#5U:%-5G [%AD | %TD | %CD] [%Y] %p\n' which believe it or not took me hundreds of tweaking before I was happy with the output. You can easily use this within a function to do whatever you want.. This simple function works recursively if you call it with -r as an argument, and sorts by file permissions. $ lsl(){ O="-maxdepth 1";sed -n '/-r/!Q1'

Create backup copy of file, adding suffix of the date of the file modification (NOT today's date)


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