Commands tagged end (1)

  • A quick and simple way of outputting the start and end date of a certificate, you can simply use 'openssl x509 -in xxxxxx.crt -noout -enddate' to output the end date (ex. notAfter=Feb 01 11:30:32 2009 GMT) and with the date command you format the output to an ISO format. For the start date use the switch -startdate and for end date use -enddate. Show Sample Output


    2
    date --date="$(openssl x509 -in xxxxxx.crt -noout -startdate | cut -d= -f 2)" --iso-8601
    rez0r · 2009-07-23 23:24:33 0

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