Commands tagged whois (5)

  • Returns nothing if the domain exists and 'No match for domain.com' otherwise.


    6
    whois domainnametocheck.com | grep match
    Timothee · 2009-08-11 13:33:25 1
  • You would need pwgen installed first, on ubuntu you can get it by apt-get sudo apt-get install pwgen Show Sample Output


    3
    for domain in $(pwgen -1A0B 6 10); do echo -ne "$domain.com "; if [ -z "$(whois -H $domain.com | grep -o 'No match for')" ]; then echo -ne "Not "; fi; echo "Available for register"; done
    mariocesar · 2011-01-26 01:10:52 2
  • Useful if you f.i. want to block/allow all connections from a certain provider which uses successive netnames for his ip blocks. In this example I used the german Deutsche Telekom which has DTAG-DIAL followed by a number as netname for the dial in pools. There are - as always ;) - different ways to do this. If you have seq available you can use net=DTAG-DIAL ; for i in `seq 1 30`; do whois -h whois.ripe.net $net$i | grep '^inetnum:' | sed "s;^.*:;$net$i;" ; done or without seq you can use bash brace expansion net=DTAG-DIAL ; for i in {1..30}; do whois -h whois.ripe.net $net$i | grep '^inetnum:' | sed "s;^.*:;$net$i;" ; done or if you like while better than for use something like net=DTAG-DIAL ; i=1 ; while true ; do whois -h whois.ripe.net $net$i | grep '^inetnum:' | sed "s;^.*:;$net$i;" ; test $i = 30 && break ; i=$(expr $i + 1) ; done and so on. Show Sample Output


    2
    net=DTAG-DIAL ; for (( i=1; i<30; i++ )); do whois -h whois.ripe.net $net$i | grep '^inetnum:' | sed "s;^.*:;$net$i;" ; done
    drizzt · 2009-08-01 05:28:19 0
  • Change the $domain variable to whichever domain you wish to query. Works with the majority of whois info; for some that won't, you may have to compromise: domain=google.com; for a in $(whois $domain | grep "Domain servers in listed order:" --after 3 | grep -v "Domain servers in listed order:"); do echo ">>> Nameservers for $domain from $a Note that this doesn't work as well as the first one; if they have more than 3 nameservers, it won't hit them all. As the summary states, this can be useful for making sure the whois nameservers for a domain match the nameserver records (NS records) from the nameservers themselves. Show Sample Output


    2
    domain=google.com; for ns in $(whois $domain | awk -F: '/Name Server/{print $2}'); do echo ">>> Nameservers for $domain from $a <<<"; dig @$ns $domain ns +short; echo; done;
    laebshade · 2011-05-08 04:46:34 0

  • 1
    whois commandlinefu.com | grep -E '^\s{3}'
    ca9lar · 2019-04-09 21:09:30 0

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