Commands tagged diff (59)

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List only directories, one per line
omit the 1 (one) if you don't need one-per-line

Mount Fat USB with RWX
after that, you can launch bash script in your usb drive in FAT32.

extract email adresses from some file (or any other pattern)
This will catch most separators in the section of the email: dot . dash - underscore _ plus + (added for gmail) ... and the basic dash '-' of host names.

Display which distro is installed
Works on Ubuntu

Easy and fast access to often executed commands that are very long and complex.
When using reverse-i-search you have to type some part of the command that you want to retrieve. However, if the command is very complex it might be difficult to recall the parts that will uniquely identify this command. Using the above trick it's possible to label your commands and access them easily by pressing ^R and typing the label (should be short and descriptive). UPDATE: One might suggest using aliases. But in that case it would be difficult to change some parts of the command (such as options, file/directory names, etc).

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

remove empty lines

Rename files in batch

Rotate all jpeg images in current folder, rename them to EXIF datetime and set files timestamp to EXIF datetime

Count files beneath current directory (including subfolders)


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