Commands tagged rev (5)

  • In case sed and awk are not available you may use this to remove the last character from a string with "rev" and "cut". Show Sample Output


    0
    echo "command lines" | rev | cut -c 2- | rev
    ztank1013 · 2011-09-21 11:27:52 0
  • Tee can be used to split a pipe into multiple streams for one or more process to work it. You can add more " >()" for even more fun. Show Sample Output


    33
    echo "tee can split a pipe in two"|tee >(rev) >(tr ' ' '_')
    axelabs · 2010-08-14 20:38:59 3
  • Just a quick hack to give reasonable filenames to TrueType and OpenType fonts. I'd accumulated a big bunch of bizarrely and inconsistently named font files in my ~/.fonts directory. I wanted to copy some, but not all, of them over to my new machine, but I had no idea what many of them were. This script renames .ttf files based on the name embedded inside the font. It will also work for .otf files, but make sure you change the mv part so it gives them the proper extension. REQUIREMENTS: Bash (for extended pattern globbing), showttf (Debian has it in the fontforge-extras package), GNU grep (for context), and rev (because it's hilarious). BUGS: Well, like I said, this is a quick hack. It grew piece by piece on the command line. I only needed to do this once and spent hardly any time on it, so it's a bit goofy. For example, I find 'rev | cut -f1 | rev' pleasantly amusing --- it seems so clearly wrong, and yet it works to print the last argument. I think flexibility in expressiveness like this is part of the beauty of Unix shell scripting. One-off tasks can be be written quickly, built-up as a person is "thinking aloud" at the command line. That's why Unix is such a huge boost to productivity: it allows each person to think their own way instead of enforcing some "right way". On a tangent: One of the things I wish commandlinefu would show is the command line HISTORY of the person as they developed the script. I think it's that conversation between programmer and computer, as the pipeline is built piece-by-piece, that is the more valuable lesson than any canned script. Show Sample Output


    2
    shopt -s extglob; for f in *.ttf *.TTF; do g=$(showttf "$f" 2>/dev/null | grep -A1 "language=0.*FullName" | tail -1 | rev | cut -f1 | rev); g=${g##+( )}; mv -i "$f" "$g".ttf; done
    hackerb9 · 2010-04-30 09:46:45 0
  • Avoids creating useless directory entries in archive, and sorts files by (roughly) extension, which is likely to group similar files together for better compression. 1%-5% improvement.


    2
    find . \! -type d | rev | sort | rev | tar c --files-from=- --format=ustar | bzip2 --best > a.tar.bz2
    pornel · 2009-12-20 14:04:39 0
  • NAME rev - reverse lines of a file or files SYNOPSIS rev [file ...] DESCRIPTION The rev utility copies the specified files to the standard output, reversing the order of characters in every line. If no files are specified, the standard input is read. AVAILABILITY The rev command is part of the util-linux-ng package and is available from ftp://ftp.kernel.org/pub/linux/utils/util-linux-ng/. Show Sample Output


    1
    echo linux|rev
    linuxrawkstar · 2009-08-04 12:28:44 4

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