Commands tagged mutt (7)

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lists files and folders in a folder
lists files and folders in a folder with summary.

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Graphical tree of sub-directories
Prints a graphical directory tree from your current directory

[vim] Clear a file in three characters (plus enter)
% selects every line in the file. 'd' deletes what's selected. It's a pretty simple combination.

In place line numbering
Add permanent line numbers to a file without creating a temp file. The rm command deletes file10 while the nl command works on the open file descriptor of file10 which it outputs into a new file again named file10. The new file10 will now be numbered in the same directory with the same file name and content as before, but it will in fact be a new file, using (ls -i) to show its inode number will prove this.

Recursively Find Images, Convert to JPEGS and Delete
Simple command to convert a large number of images into jpeg-format. Will delete originals after conversion.

Make vim open in tabs by default (save to .profile)
I always add this to my .profile rc so I can do things like: "vim *.c" and the files are opened in tabs.

Find the package that installed a command

Quickly graph a list of numbers
Useful when you've produced a large file of numbers, and want to quickly see the distribution. The value of y halfway along the x axis is the median. Simple! Just create the listOfNumbers.txt file with a number on each line to try it out.

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.


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