Commands tagged getconf (2)

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HDD Performance Write Test
Test your XFS filesystem and Raptor hard drives for write performance.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Find the package that installed a command

easily find megabyte eating files or directories
This is easy to type if you are looking for a few (hundred) "missing" megabytes (and don't mind the occasional K slipping in)... A variation without false positives and also finding gigabytes (but - depending on your keyboard setup - more painful to type): $du -hs *|grep -P '^(\d|,)+(M|G)'|sort -n (NOTE: you might want to replace the ',' according to your locale!) Don't forget that you can modify the globbing as needed! (e.g. '.[^\.]* *' to include hidden files and directories (w/ bash)) in its core similar to: http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/706/show-sorted-list-of-files-with-sizes-more-than-1mb-in-the-current-dir

Exclude inserting a table from a sql import
Starting with a large MySQL dump file (*.sql) remove any lines that have inserts for the specified table. Sometimes one or two tables are very large and uneeded, eg. log tables. To exclude multiple tables you can get fancy with sed, or just run the command again on subsequently generated files.

Take a screenshot every 2 seconds
Take a screenshot every 2 seconds and save it as a png file

Updating to Fedora 11

turn off auto hard disc boot scanning for ext3

Buffer in order to avoir mistakes with redirections that empty your files
A common mistake in Bash is to write command-line where there's command a reading a file and whose result is redirected to that file. It can be easily avoided because of : 1) warnings "-bash: file.txt: cannot overwrite existing file" 2) options (often "-i") that let the command directly modify the file but I like to have that small function that does the trick by waiting for the first command to end before trying to write into the file. Lots of things could probably done in a better way, if you know one...

Create a directory and go inside it
$_ expands to the last argument of the last command that was executed


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