Commands tagged 64 (3)

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force unsupported i386 commands to work on amd64
The above was done using the i386 flashplayer plugin, and was installed on a AMD64 machine running an AMD64 kernel and AMD64 programs. the resulting plugin install ultimately didn't work for swiftfox (but worked for iceweasel) without also covering it with a nspluginwrapper which took a bit of fenangaling to get to work (lots of apt-getting) but it is a nice feature to be able to trick installers that think you need i386 into running on a amd64, or at least attempting to run on amd64. Enjoy

Give {Open,True}Type files reasonable names
Just a quick hack to give reasonable filenames to TrueType and OpenType fonts. I'd accumulated a big bunch of bizarrely and inconsistently named font files in my ~/.fonts directory. I wanted to copy some, but not all, of them over to my new machine, but I had no idea what many of them were. This script renames .ttf files based on the name embedded inside the font. It will also work for .otf files, but make sure you change the mv part so it gives them the proper extension. REQUIREMENTS: Bash (for extended pattern globbing), showttf (Debian has it in the fontforge-extras package), GNU grep (for context), and rev (because it's hilarious). BUGS: Well, like I said, this is a quick hack. It grew piece by piece on the command line. I only needed to do this once and spent hardly any time on it, so it's a bit goofy. For example, I find 'rev | cut -f1 | rev' pleasantly amusing --- it seems so clearly wrong, and yet it works to print the last argument. I think flexibility in expressiveness like this is part of the beauty of Unix shell scripting. One-off tasks can be be written quickly, built-up as a person is "thinking aloud" at the command line. That's why Unix is such a huge boost to productivity: it allows each person to think their own way instead of enforcing some "right way". On a tangent: One of the things I wish commandlinefu would show is the command line HISTORY of the person as they developed the script. I think it's that conversation between programmer and computer, as the pipeline is built piece-by-piece, that is the more valuable lesson than any canned script.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

removes characters from cursor to the end of line

Protect directory from an overzealous rm -rf *
-R Recursively change attributes of directories and their contents. +i to set the immutable bit to prevent even root from erasing or changing the contents of a file.

get xclip to own the clipboard contents
"Copying" things to the X clipboard doesn't normally create a copy. Rather the data to be 'copied' is referenced. This means that if the application that you 'copied' stuff from is closed, that data is lost. If the application that you 'copied' from is suspended with CTRL-Z, there could be some issues if you try to paste it into something. This command will create a copy of referenced data and have xclip be the provider of it, so you can then go ahead and close the app that contains the original information. Caveat: I'm not sure if this is binary-safe (though i would expect it to be), and don't know what would happen if you used it to clip a 20 meg gimp image. This technique becomes more convenient if you set it up as an action in a clipboard manager (eg klipper, parcellite). Some of these applets can take automatic action based on a variety of parameters, so you could probably just get it to always own the clipped data whenever data is clipped.

Give any files that don't already have it group read permission under the current folder (recursive)
Makes any files in the current directory (and any sub-directories) group-readable. Using the "! -perm /g=r" limits the number of files to only those that do not already have this property Using "+" on the end of the -exec body tells find to build the entire command by appending all matching files before execution, so invokes chmod once only, not once per file.

Create a system overview dashboard on F12 key
Command binds a set of commands to the F12 key. Feel free to alter the dashboard according to your own needs. How to find the key codes? Type $ read Then press the desired key (example: F5) $ ^[[15~ Try $ bind '"\e[15~"':"\"ssh su@ip-address\C-m""" or $ bind '"\e[16~"':"\"apachectl -k restart\C-m"""

recursive transform all contents of files to lowercase
In this way it doesn't have problems with filenames with spaces.

High resolution video screen recording
$ gorecord foo.mp4 I've tried all of the screen recorders available for Linux and this is easily the best. xvidcap segfaults; VNC is too much hassle. There are alternatives of this command already here that I am just too lazy to reply to. Messing with the frames per second option, -r, 25 seems to be the best. Any lower and the video will look like a flipbook, if it records at all - -r 10 won't - any faster is the same, oddly enough. Edit: CLF doesn't like my long command to add audio, so here it is in the description. $ goaddaudio() ${ $if [ $# != 3 ]; then $ echo 'goaddaudio < audio > < src video > < dst video >' $ return $ fi $ $ f=goaddaudio$RANDOM $ ffmpeg -i "$2" &> $f $ d=$( grep Duration $f | awk '{print $2}' | tr -d ',' ) && $ rm $f && $ ffmpeg -i "$1" -i "$2" -r 25 -ab 192k -ar 44100 -sameq -t $d "$3" $}


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