Commands tagged /dev/mem (2)

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Listen to BBC Radio from the command line.
This command lets you select from 10 different BBC stations. When one is chosen, it streams it with mplayer. Requires: mplayer with wma support.

Capture data in ASCII. 1500 bytes
Sniffing traffic on port 80 only the first 1500 bytes

List symbols from a dynamic library (.so file)
You can get what functions at which addresses are inside a dynamic link library by this tool.

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

An alternative to: python -m SimpleHTTPServer for Arch Linux
An alternative to: python -m SimpleHTTPServer for Arch Linux source: http://archlinux.me/dusty/2010/01/15/simplehttpserver-in-python-3/

Extended man command
This microscript looks up a man page for each word possible, and if the correct page is not found, uses w3m and Google's "I'm feeling lucky" to output a first possible result. This script was made as a result of an idea on a popular Linux forum, where users often send other people to RTFM by saying something like "man backup" or "man ubuntu one". To make this script replace the usual man command, save it as ".man.sh" in your home folder and add the following string to the end of your .bashrc file: alias man='~/.man.sh'

Scan Subnet for IP and MAC addresses

Calculate N!

Show Shared Library Mappings
shows which shared lib files are pointed to by the dynamic linker.

cd to (or operate on) a file across parallel directories
This is useful for quickly jumping around branches in a file system, or operating on a parellel file. This is tested in bash. cd to (substitute in PWD, a for b) where PWD is the bash environmental variable for the "working directory"


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