Commands tagged ps (86)


  • -1
    ps aux | grep name | grep -v grep | awk '{print $2}' | xargs kill -9
    unixmonkey84604 · 2014-11-11 09:19:24 8
  • Function that searchs a process by its name and shows in the terminal. * Shows the Header for reference * Hides the process 'grep' from the list * Case sensitive Show Sample Output


    -1
    psg(){ ps aux | grep -v grep | egrep -e "$1|USER"; }
    ivanalejandro0 · 2014-12-31 22:27:27 9
  • Note that `grep "$(ir foo)"` really doesn't save any typing, but wrapping this inside a second shell function will: psg() { grep "$(ir \"$@\")" ;} Show Sample Output


    -1
    ir() { perl -pne 's/(.)(.*)/\[\1]\2/' <<< "$@" ;}
    bartonski · 2015-07-25 14:13:33 12
  • The '[r]' is to avoid grep from grepping itself. (interchange 'r' by the appropriate letter) Here is an example that I use a lot (as root or halt will not work): while (ps -ef | grep [w]get); do sleep 10; done; sleep 60; halt I add the 'sleep 60' command just in case something went wrong; so that I have time to cancel. Very useful if you are going to bed while downloading something and do not want your computer running all night.


    -2
    while (ps -ef | grep [r]unning_program_name); do sleep 10; done; command_to_execute
    m_a_xim · 2010-01-14 16:26:34 4
  • You'll need to install proctools. MacPorts and Fink have this if you're running Mac OS X, check your Linux distribution's repositories if it isn't installed by default. Show Sample Output


    -2
    pgrep <name>
    alesplin · 2010-02-28 22:59:33 11
  • hb(){ sed "s/\($*\)/`tput setaf 2;tput setab 0;tput blink`\1`tput sgr0`/gI"; } hb blinks, hc does a reverse color with background.. both very nice. hc(){ sed "s/\($*\)/`tput setaf 0;tput setab 6`\1`tput sgr0`/gI"; } Run this: command ps -Hacl -F S -A f | hc ".*$PPID.*" | hb ".*$$.*" Your welcome ;) From my bash profile - http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html Show Sample Output


    -2
    hb(){ sed "s/\($*\)/`tput setaf 2;tput setab 0;tput blink`\1`tput sgr0`/gI"; }
    AskApache · 2010-04-07 08:45:26 5

  • -2
    pgrep -lf
    ajkaanbal · 2013-07-30 14:10:41 8
  • Function that searchs for process by its name: * Shows the Header for reference * Hides the process 'grep' from the list * Case sensitive The typical problem with using "ps | grep" is that the grep process shows up the in the output. The usual solution is to search for "[p]attern" instead of "pattern". This function turns the parameter into just such a [p]attern. ${1:0:1} is the first character of $1 . ${1:1} is characters 2-end of $1 Show Sample Output


    -2
    psg(){ ps aux | grep -E "[${1:0:1}]${1:1}|^USER"; }
    flatcap · 2015-01-01 00:12:45 9

  • -3
    ps -axgu | cut -f1 -d' ' | sort -u
    dfaulkner · 2010-07-07 12:29:46 6
  • Grep for a named process. Show Sample Output


    -4
    psgrep() { if [ ! -z $1 ]; then echo "Grepping for processes matching $1..." ps aux | grep -i $1 | grep -v grep; else echo "!! Need name to grep for"; fi }
    evenme · 2010-02-27 13:47:28 8
  • David thanks for that grep inside! here is mine version: psgrep() { case ${1} in ( -E | -e ) local EXTENDED_REGEXP=1 shift 1 ;; *) local EXTENDED_REGEXP=0 ;; esac if [[ -z ${*} ]] then echo "psgrep - grep for process(es) by keyword" >&2 echo "Usage: psgrep [-E|-e] ... " >&2 echo "" >&2 echo "option [-E|-e] enables full extended regexp support" >&2 echo "without [-E|-e] plain strings are looked for" >&2 return 1 fi \ps -eo 'user,pid,pcpu,command' w | head -n1 local ARG='' if (( ${EXTENDED_REGEXP} == 0 )) then while (( ${#} > 0 )) do ARG="${1}" shift 1 local STRING=${ARG} local LENGTH=$(expr length ${STRING}) local FIRSCHAR=$(echo $(expr substr ${STRING} 1 1)) local REST=$(echo $(expr substr ${STRING} 2 ${LENGTH})) \ps -eo 'user,pid,pcpu,command' w | grep "[${FIRSCHAR}]${REST}" done else \ps -eo 'user,pid,pcpu,command' w | grep -iE "(${*})" fi }


    -10
    psgrep() ... func to long, please look under "description"
    Xk2c · 2015-01-01 02:58:48 8
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