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Simple Comment an entire file
With this simple sed command we can easily comment and entire file.

currently mounted filesystems in nice layout
since fuse mounts do not appear in /etc/mtab (fuse can't write there, dunno if it would if it could) this is propably a better way.

make 100 directories with leading zero, 001...100, using bash3.X

!* Tells that you want all of the *arguments* from the previous command to be repeated in the current command
Example: touch file{1,2,3}; chmod 777 !*

Top 30 History
Top 30 History Command line with histogram display

prevent large files from being cached in memory (backups!)
We all know... $ nice -n19 for low CPU priority.   $ ionice -c3 for low I/O priority.   nocache can be useful in related scenarios, when we operate on very large files just a single time, e.g. a backup job. It advises the kernel that no caching is required for the involved files, so our current file cache is not erased, potentially decreasing performance on other, more typical file I/O, e.g. on a desktop.   http://askubuntu.com/questions/122857 https://github.com/Feh/nocache http://packages.debian.org/search?keywords=nocache http://packages.ubuntu.com/search?keywords=nocache   To undo caching of a single file in hindsight, you can do $ cachedel   To check the cache status of a file, do $ cachestats

Search $PATH for a command or something similar
Searches your $PATH for whatever you substitute for bash, though not sure if this will work if you substitute a different shell for bash!

Show LAN IP with ip(8)
$ ip address show | grep eth0 | sed '1d' | awk '{print $2}' does the same, but shows network-prefix.

Use mplayer to save video streams to a file
I use this command to save RTSP video streams over night from one of our national TV stations, so I won't have to squeeze the data through my slow internet connection when I want to watch it the next day. For ease of use, you might want to put this in a file: #!/bin/bash FILE="`basename \"$1\"`" mplayer -dumpstream -dumpfile "$FILE" -playlist "$1"

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.


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