Commands tagged wordpress (4)

  • The coolest way I've found to backup a wordpress mysql database using encryption, and using local variables created directly from the wp-config.php file so that you don't have to type them- which would allow someone sniffing your terminal or viewing your shell history to see your info. I use a variation of this for my servers that have hundreds of wordpress installs and databases by using a find command for the wp-config.php file and passing that through xargs to my function. Show Sample Output


    4
    eval $(sed -n "s/^d[^D]*DB_\([NUPH]\)[ASO].*',[^']*'\([^']*\)'.*/_\1='\2'/p" wp-config.php) && mysqldump --opt --add-drop-table -u$_U -p$_P -h$_H $_N | gpg -er AskApache >`date +%m%d%y-%H%M.$_N.sqls`
    AskApache · 2009-08-18 07:03:08 0
  • This will extract the differing CSS entries of two files. I've left the initial character (plus or space) in output to show the real differing line, remove the initial character to get a working CSS file. The output CSS file is usable by either adding it in a below the to original.css, or by only using the output but adding @import url("original.css"); in the beginning. This is very useful for converting Wordpress theme copies into real Wordpress child themes. Could exclude common lines within entries too, I guess, but that might not be worth the complexity. Show Sample Output


    0
    diff -U99999 original.css modified.css | awk '/^-/{next} {f=f"\n"$0} /^\+.*[^ ]/{yes=1} /}/ {if(yes){print f} f="";yes=0}'
    unhammer · 2012-01-12 07:57:22 1

  • 0
    ssh -q ${SRC_HOST} "mysqldump --add-drop-database --create-options --databases wordpress | sed -r \"s/${OLD_URL}/${NEW_URL}/g\" | gzip -9" | ssh ${DST_HOST} "gunzip | mysql"
    bendon · 2013-05-16 14:46:57 0

  • 0
    mkdir -p src && chmod 777 src && docker run -v $(pwd)/src:/var/www/html wordpress:cli core download && chmod 755 src
    nabil_kadimi · 2018-09-01 18:06:42 0

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