Commands tagged foundry (8)


  • 1
    dm display-buffer reset
    curiousstranger · 2009-08-24 16:41:52 0
  • The sample output, is a display of the values you can change, using this command. After a change of of these settings you will need to reload the box, by typing...wait...wait for IT: 'reload'. This comes in handy when working with the RX hardware, for example, which has a base limitation of 32 (RSTP (802-1w) instances. For all of you paying attention that means if you run RSTP on a RX you can only have 32 VLANs. Sure, you can have common groups of VLANs, like back in the day style MSTP, PVST, PVST+ (and all that old STP (802.1d) mess), before "per vlan spanning-tree", RSTP (802-1w), was made. But who wants to do all that? Show Sample Output


    -2
    system max <some value>
    rootgeek · 2010-03-26 02:39:00 0
  • 'no untag' is applied to _all_ ports under the default VLAN. Otherwise the default VLAN runs untagged over all physical ports. Pretty good idea to 'prune' your VLANs and define which ones pass over and across trunks that carry the default VLAN traffic. Show Sample Output


    -3
    no untag
    rootgeek · 2010-03-26 02:45:32 0
  • This is how you make sure that ports in a VLAN remain, root ports. Typically, you would use this command on all your Core-1 switch VLAN ports, and then use 'rstp priority 1' on all your Core-2 switches. This is if you have a dual L3 core that is. Show Sample Output


    -3
    rstp priority 0
    rootgeek · 2010-03-26 02:51:54 0
  • You need all those commands, in the sample output. I had some of this, but had to play, add remove, type random stuff like a monkey to finally get this working (clearly those IP's are fake to protect the guilty, and so is the key). Show Sample Output


    -3
    aaa authentication login default local tacacs+
    rootgeek · 2010-03-26 02:58:03 0
  • Okay, Jimmy, the command 'optical-monitor' is needed within the global config. for this command to work (and if supported by your licsense: yada yada, blah, blah). But, like its mad PHAT Kid, you dig? Basically, a Foundry/Brocade switch is reading the Laser light levels just like those Fiber test kits from Owl that cost 4k. I know, I also find it hard to contain myeself ;-) No really..... Show Sample Output


    -3
    show optic <slot #>
    rootgeek · 2010-03-26 03:07:22 0

  • -4
    sh default values
    rootgeek · 2010-03-26 02:36:57 0
  • The sample output, is the command with a ?, to show you all the stuff you can look at. Show Sample Output


    -4
    dm ?
    rootgeek · 2010-03-26 02:42:21 0

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