Commands tagged group (7)

  • I usually have 5 or more ssh connections to various servers, and putting this command in my .bash_profile file makes my putty window or x terminal window title change to this easily recognizable and descriptive text. Includes the username, group, server hostname, where I am connecting from (for SSH tunneling), which device pts, current server load, and how many processes are running. You can also use this for your PROMPT_COMMAND variable, which updates the window title to the current values each time you exec a command. I prefix running this in my .bash_profile with [[ ! -z "$SSH_TTY" ]] && which makes sure it only does this when connecting via SSH with a TTY. Here's some rougher examples from http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html # If set, the value is executed as a command prior to issuing each primary prompt. #H=$((hostname || uname -n) 2>/dev/null | sed 1q);W=$(whoami) #export PROMPT_COMMAND='echo -ne "\033]0;${W}@${H}:${PWD/#$HOME/~} ${SSH_TTY/\/dev\//} [`uptime|sed -e "s/.*: \([^,]*\).*/\1/" -e "s/ //g"`]\007"' #PROMPT_COMMAND='echo -ne "\033]0;`id -un`:`id -gn`@`hostname||uname -n 2>/dev/null|sed 1q` `command who -m|sed -e "s%^.* \(pts/[0-9]*\).*(\(.*\))%[\1] (\2)%g"` [`uptime|sed -e "s/.*: \([^,]*\).*/\1/" -e "s/ //g"` / `command ps aux|wc -l`]\007"' #[[ -z "$SSH_TTY" ]] || export PROMPT_COMMAND #[[ -z "$SSH_TTY" ]] && [[ -f /dev/stdout ]] && SSH_TTY=/dev/stdout And here's a simple function example for setting the title: function set_window_title(){ echo -e "\033]0; ${1:[email protected]$HOST - $SHLVL} \007"; } Show Sample Output


    4
    echo -ne "\033]0;`id -un`:`id -gn`@`hostname||uname -n|sed 1q` `who -m|sed -e "s%^.* \(pts/[0-9]*\).*(\(.*\))%[\1] (\2)%g"` [`uptime|sed -e "s/.*: \([^,]*\).*/\1/" -e "s/ //g"` / `ps aux|wc -l`]\007"
    AskApache · 2009-09-19 06:57:53 1
  • lists files and folders in a folder with summary. Show Sample Output


    2
    tree -i -L 1
    antonangeli · 2016-07-11 18:48:21 0
  • adding users to groups on OS X is not a straightforward process, you need to use the new in built in Directory Service command line utility...


    0
    sudo dscl localhost -append /Local/Default/Groups/admin GroupMembership username
    kulor · 2009-09-03 04:40:10 0
  • -secgrp no for distribution -scope u for distribution


    0
    dsadd group cn=group_name,dc=example,dc=com -secgrp yes -scope g -samid group_name
    shawn_abdushakur · 2014-03-06 15:25:17 0

  • 0
    dsquery group -samid "group_name" | dsmod group "cn=group_name",dc=example,dc=com" -addmbr
    shawn_abdushakur · 2014-03-06 19:19:04 0
  • Group membership in OS X is a mish-mash of standards that end up meaning there's almost a half-dozen of ways to belong to a group, what with group inheritance and automatic assignment. This means there's no easy command to find out all groups a user belongs to. The only sensible way then is to list all users and then query each user for membership. NOTE: This is a function. Once input you can execute it by calling with a groupname. Show Sample Output


    -1
    members () { dscl . -list /Users | while read user; do printf "$user "; dsmemberutil checkmembership -U "$user" -G "$*"; done | grep "is a member" | cut -d " " -f 1; };
    eduo · 2012-05-20 11:34:33 0
  • Install with `npm install unix-permissions`. https://github.com/ehmicky/unix-permissions Unix file permissions can take many shapes: symbolic (`ug+rw`), octal (`660`) or a list of characters (`drw-rw----`). `unix-permissions` enables using any of these (instead of being limited to a single one) with any CLI command. Show Sample Output


    -1
    unix-permissions convert.stat $(unix-permissions invert $(umask))
    ehmicky · 2019-02-05 14:06:08 0

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change user & preserver environment (.bashrc&co)

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Get IP address from domain

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Ever needed to test firewalls but didn't have netcat, telnet or even FTP? Enter /dev/tcp, your new best friend. /dev/tcp/(hostname)/(port) is a bash builtin that bash can use to open connections to TCP and UDP ports. This one-liner opens a connection on a port to a server and lets you read and write to it from the terminal. How it works: First, exec sets up a redirect for /dev/tcp/$server/$port to file descriptor 5. Then, as per some excellent feedback from @flatcap, we launch a redirect from file descriptor 5 to STDOUT and send that to the background (which is what causes the PID to be printed when the commands are run), and then redirect STDIN to file descriptor 5 with the second cat. Finally, when the second cat dies (the connection is closed), we clean up the file descriptor with 'exec 5>&-'. It can be used to test FTP, HTTP, NTP, or can connect to netcat listening on a port (makes for a simple chat client!) Replace /tcp/ with /udp/ to use UDP instead.


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