Commands tagged lspci (6)

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Display HTTP-header using curl

Kill google chrome process

Search for packages, ranked by popularity
This will take the packages matching a given `apt-cache search` query (a collection of AND'd words or regexps) and tell you how popular they are. This is particularly nice for those times you have to figure out which solution to use for e.g. a PDF reader or a VNC client. Substitute "ubuntu.com" for "debian.org" if you want this to use Ubuntu's data instead. Everything else will work perfectly.

RTFM function
Sometimes you don't have man pages only '-h' or '--help'.

Prepend a text to a file.
The original command is great, but I often want to prepend to every line.

Find and copy scattered mp3 files into one directory
This command copies all filenames in the current dir and subdirs that end in .mp3 regardless of case (also matches .MP3 .mP3 and .Mp3) It copies all the files to the "mp3" folder in your home directory. If you want to see the files that are beeing copied, replace "cp {}" with "cp -v {}"

Monitor RAID IO Usage
Shows the IO of the raid sync

print lib path of perl

Show the power of the home row on the Dvorak Keyboard layout
Quick and dirty command that counts how many words can be typed just using the home row on the Dvorak Simplified Keyboard layout from a dictionary file, in this case /usr/share/dict/words. According to the regular expression supplied, each word must contain all the keys on the Dvorak home row, and no other characters. For comparison, I've shown how many words are installed in my dictionary, how many can be typed with just the Dvorak home row and how many can be typed with just the QWERTY home row in the sample output. Nearly 10 times the amount. If you want to see the words, remove the -c switch, and each word will be printed out.

Delete the specified line


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