Commands tagged divx (6)

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Connect to all running screen instances
There was another line that was dependent on having un-named screen sessions. This just wouldn't do. This one works no matter what the name is. A possible improvement would be removing the perl dependence, but that doesn't effect me.

To print a specific line from a file
You can get one specific line during any procedure. Very interesting to be used when you know what line you want.

Create a file of a given size in linux

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

Right-align text in console using pipe like ( command | right )

If (and only if) the variable is not set, prompt users and give them a default option already filled in.
The read command reads input and puts it into a variable. With -i you set an initial value. In this case I used a known environment variable.

Host cpu performance
Measure the cpu performance: In-case if the cpu is thermal throttling then you can find it using this command. Check the first line of the output. Example: Doing md5 for 3s on 16 size blocks: 11406892 md5's in 2.98s ? #(When cpu is not throttling) Doing md5 for 3s on 16 size blocks: 110692 md5's in 2.98s ?? #(When cpu is thermal throttling) Practical use case: Once we had cooling outage in data center which caused thermal throttling in some of the worker nodes. We used this tool to prove that some servers are not performing well because of the cpu thermal throttling.

Change gnome-shell wallpaper

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }


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