Commands tagged mpeg4 (7)

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Check if a package is installed. If it is, the version number will be shown.
If the first two letters are "ii", then the package is installed. You can also use wildcards. For example, . $ dpkg -l openoffice* . Note that dpkg will usually not report packages which are available but uninstalled. If you want to see both which versions are installed and which versions are available, use this command instead: . $ apt-cache policy python

quickest (i blv) way to get the current program name minus the path (BASH)
Useful in shell scripts when you're trying to get the shell script name without the full path - and easier than awking or cutting. Bash pattern matching and variable manip is fun.

copy file to clipboard
Loads file content on clipboard. Very useful when text selection size is higher than console size.

Send a local file via email
This just reads in a local file and sends it via email. Works with text or binary. *Requires* local mail server.

Switch to the previous branch used in git(1)
Very useful if you keep switching between the same two branches all the time.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Gets the english pronunciation of a phrase
Usage examples: say hello say "hello world" say hello+world

List just the executable files (or directories) in current directory
A bit shorter ;)

Rapidly invoke an editor to write a long, complex, or tricky command
Next time you are using your shell, try typing ctrl-x e (that is holding control key press x and then e). The shell will take what you've written on the command line thus far and paste it into the editor specified by $EDITOR. Then you can edit at leisure using all the powerful macros and commands of vi, emacs, nano, or whatever.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"


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