Commands tagged alsa (13)

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Download all Red Hat Manuals - A better way by user Flatcap
Let's give Flatcap credit for this elegant solution, instead of leaving it hidden as a comment. Tested on RHEL6 and it works. Nice and clean.

Send email with one or more binary attachments
This command uses mutt to send the mail. You must pipe in a body, otherwise mutt will prompt you for some stuff. If you don't have mutt, it should be dead easy to install.

List the size (in human readable form) of all sub folders from the current location
Simple and easy to remember. -h is human, -d1 = depth 1. disk usage, human, depth 1

Then end of the UNIX epoch
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Year_2038_problem Some other notable dates that have passed: $ date [email protected] $ date [email protected]

find large files
simple find -> xargs sort of thing that I get a lot of use out of. Helps find huge files and gives an example of how to use xargs to deal with them. Tested on OSX snow leopard (10.6). Enjoy.

Terminate a frozen SSH-session
A key sequence for terminating a frozen session. Full sequence on a swedish keyboard: [ENTER] [ALTGR] tilde [SPACE] dot

renice by name

Monitoring file handles used by a particular process
-r : repeat mode

Find Duplicate Files (based on size first, then MD5 hash)
If you have the fdupes command, you'll save a lot of typing. It can do recursive searches (-r,-R) and it allows you to interactively select which of the duplicate files found you wish to keep or delete.

sort the output of the 'du' command by largest first, using human readable output.
In this case I'm just grabbing the next level of subdirectories (and same level regular files) with the --max-depth=1 flag. leaving out that flag will just give you finer resolution. Note that you have to use the -h switch with both 'du' and with 'sort.'


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