Commands tagged username (5)

  • I usually have 5 or more ssh connections to various servers, and putting this command in my .bash_profile file makes my putty window or x terminal window title change to this easily recognizable and descriptive text. Includes the username, group, server hostname, where I am connecting from (for SSH tunneling), which device pts, current server load, and how many processes are running. You can also use this for your PROMPT_COMMAND variable, which updates the window title to the current values each time you exec a command. I prefix running this in my .bash_profile with [[ ! -z "$SSH_TTY" ]] && which makes sure it only does this when connecting via SSH with a TTY. Here's some rougher examples from http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html # If set, the value is executed as a command prior to issuing each primary prompt. #H=$((hostname || uname -n) 2>/dev/null | sed 1q);W=$(whoami) #export PROMPT_COMMAND='echo -ne "\033]0;${W}@${H}:${PWD/#$HOME/~} ${SSH_TTY/\/dev\//} [`uptime|sed -e "s/.*: \([^,]*\).*/\1/" -e "s/ //g"`]\007"' #PROMPT_COMMAND='echo -ne "\033]0;`id -un`:`id -gn`@`hostname||uname -n 2>/dev/null|sed 1q` `command who -m|sed -e "s%^.* \(pts/[0-9]*\).*(\(.*\))%[\1] (\2)%g"` [`uptime|sed -e "s/.*: \([^,]*\).*/\1/" -e "s/ //g"` / `command ps aux|wc -l`]\007"' #[[ -z "$SSH_TTY" ]] || export PROMPT_COMMAND #[[ -z "$SSH_TTY" ]] && [[ -f /dev/stdout ]] && SSH_TTY=/dev/stdout And here's a simple function example for setting the title: function set_window_title(){ echo -e "\033]0; ${1:[email protected]$HOST - $SHLVL} \007"; } Show Sample Output


    4
    echo -ne "\033]0;`id -un`:`id -gn`@`hostname||uname -n|sed 1q` `who -m|sed -e "s%^.* \(pts/[0-9]*\).*(\(.*\))%[\1] (\2)%g"` [`uptime|sed -e "s/.*: \([^,]*\).*/\1/" -e "s/ //g"` / `ps aux|wc -l`]\007"
    AskApache · 2009-09-19 06:57:53 1
  • An easy function to get a process tree listing (very detailed) for all the processes of any gived user. This function is also in my http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html Show Sample Output


    4
    psu(){ command ps -Hcl -F S f -u ${1:-$USER}; }
    AskApache · 2009-11-13 06:10:33 1
  • * Replace USERNAME with the desired svn username * Replace the first YYYY-MM-DD with the date you want to get the log (this starts at the midnight event that starts this date) * Replace the second YYYY-MM-DD with the date after you want to get the log (this will end the log scan on midnight of the previous day) Example, if I want the log for December 10, 2010, I would put {2010-12-10}:{2010-12-11} Show Sample Output


    1
    svn log -r '{YYYY-MM-DD}:{YYYY-MM-DD}' | sed -n '1p; 2,/^-/d; /USERNAME/,/^-/p' | grep -E -v '^(r[0-9]|---|$)' | sed 's/^/* /g'
    antic · 2010-12-22 17:52:19 1
  • Its possible to user a simple regex to extract de username from the finger command. The final echo its optional, just for remove the initial space Show Sample Output


    0
    finger $(whoami) | egrep -o 'Name: [a-zA-Z0-9 ]{1,}' | cut -d ':' -f 2 | xargs echo
    swebber · 2014-09-24 01:22:07 1

  • 0
    finger $(whoami) | perl -ne '/Name: ([a-zA-Z0-9 ]{1,})/ && print "$1\n"'
    zil0g · 2014-09-30 11:37:47 0

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