Commands tagged ansi (13)

  • I've been using linux for almost a decade and only recently discovered that most terminals like putty, xterm, xfree86, vt100, etc., support hundreds of shades of colors, backgrounds and text/terminal effects. This simply prints out a ton of them, the output is pretty amazing. If you use non-x terminals all the time like I do, it can really be helpful to know how to tweak colors and terminal capabilities. Like: echo $'\33[H\33[2J'


    17
    for c in `seq 0 255`;do t=5;[[ $c -lt 108 ]]&&t=0;for i in `seq $t 5`;do echo -e "\e[0;48;$i;${c}m|| $i:$c `seq -s+0 $(($COLUMNS/2))|tr -d '[0-9]'`\e[0m";done;done
    AskApache · 2009-11-03 09:12:13 2
  • Removes ANSI color and end of line codes to the [{attr1};...;{attrn}m format.


    5
    sed -r "s/\x1B\[([0-9]{1,3}((;[0-9]{1,3})*)?)?[m|K]//g
    vaejovis · 2009-11-03 00:34:06 1
  • required packages: curl, xml2, html2text command is truncated, see 'sample output' Show Sample Output


    3
    open R,"curl -s http://feeds2.feedburner.com/Command-line-fu|xml2|"; while(<R>){ chomp; m(^/rss/channel/item/title=) and do{ s/^.*?=//; ($t,$d,$l)=($_,undef,undef) }; m(^/rss/channel/item/description=) and do{ s/^.*?=//; push @d,$_ }; m(^/rss/channel/item
    bandie91 · 2012-02-24 23:40:02 2
  • I was looking for the fastest way to create a bunch of ansi escapes for use in echo -e commands throughout a lot of my shell scripts. This is what I came up with, and I actually stick that loop command in a function and then just call that at the beginning of my scripts to not clutter the environment with these escape codes, which can wreck havok on my terminal when I'm dumping the environment. More of a cool way to store escape ansi codes in an array. You can echo them like: echo -e "${CC[15]}This text is black on bright green background." I usually just use with a function: # setup_colors - Adds colors to array CC for global use # 30 - Black, 31 - Red, 32 - Green, 33 - Yellow, 34 - Blue, 35 - Magenta, 36 - Blue/Green, 37 - White, 30/42 - Black on Green '30\;42' function setup_colors(){ declare -ax CC; for i in `seq 0 7`;do ii=$(($i+7));CC[$i]="\033[1;3${i}m";CC[$ii]="\033[0;3${i}m";done;CC[15]="\033[30;42m"; export R='\033[0;00m';export X="\033[1;37m"; }; export -f setup_colors CC[15] has a background of bright green which is why it is separate. R resets everything, and X is my default font of bright white. CC[15]="\033[30;42m"; R=$'\033[0;00m'; X=$'\033[1;37m' Those are just my favorite colors that I often use in my scripts. You can test which colors by running for i in $(seq 0 $((${#CC[@]} - 1))); do echo -e "${CC[$i]}[$i]\n$R"; done See: http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html for more usage. Show Sample Output


    1
    declare -ax CC; for i in `seq 0 7`;do ii=$(($i+7)); CC[$i]="\033[1;3${i}m"; CC[$ii]="\033[0;3${i}m"; done
    AskApache · 2009-09-21 07:00:55 4
  • This uses Text::Highlight to output the specified Perl file with syntax highlighting. A better alternative is my App::perlhl - find it on the CPAN: http://p3rl.org/App::perlhl


    1
    perl -MText::Highlight -E '$h=Text::Highlight->new(ansi=>1); my $text=do{local $/; open my $fh, "<", $ARGV[0]; <$fh>}; say $h->highlight("Perl", $text);' path/to/perl-file.pl
    doherty · 2011-01-31 05:52:43 1

  • 1
    perl -mText::Highlight -E 'say Text::Highlight->new(ansi => 1)->highlight(Perl => do { local (@ARGV,$/) = shift; <> }) ' path/to/perl-file.pl
    dbr · 2011-07-12 04:55:12 1
  • Pre-packaged python script that comes with Debian/Ubuntu. Show Sample Output


    1
    colortest-python
    eikenberry · 2012-10-26 06:50:01 0
  • Terminal Color tester using python, works with py2 and 3 Show Sample Output


    1
    alias colortest="python -c \"print('\n'.join([(' '.join([('\033[38;5;' + str((i + j)) + 'm' + str((i + j)).ljust(5) + '\033[0m') if i + j < 256 else '' for j in range(10)])) for i in range(0, 256, 10)]))\""
    Paaskehare · 2012-10-26 07:43:06 0
  • I learned a few things reading this command. But I did run into a few issues: 1. On systems that don't use GNU echo (e.g. macOS 10.14.5 Mojave), the e option may not be supported. In this case ANSI escape codes will echoed as text and the terminal will not flash, like this: \e[?5h\e[38;5;1m A L E R T Thu Jun 20 16:31:29 PDT 2019 2. Since the read command strips\ignores leading backslashes, if a user types the backslash character once in the loop, it will not break. Typing backslash twice in a loop will break as expected. 3. The foreground color is set to red (\e[38;5;1m) on every loop. This could be set once before we call while, and then reset once when the loop breaks. 4. Instead of resetting the foreground color when it breaks, the video mode is set back to normal (\e[?5l). This has the effect of leaving the terminal text red until it is manually reset. The alternative I'm proposing here addresses these issues. I tested it on macOS and Arch Linux. Show Sample Output


    1
    printf "\e[38;5;1m"; while true; do printf "\e[?5h A L E R T %s\n" "$(date)"; sleep 0.1; printf "\e[?5l"; read -r -s -n1 -t1 && printf "\e[39m" && break; done
    z80a · 2019-06-21 00:05:16 0
  • Echoes text horizontally centralized based on screen width


    0
    centralized(){ L=`echo -n $*|wc -c`; echo -e "\x1b[$[ ($COLUMNS / 2) - ($L / 2) ]C$*"; }
    xenomuta · 2012-08-16 18:19:26 0
  • Catches some background colors missed by the highest rated alternative.


    0
    sed -r "s@\^\[{1,2}([0-9]{1,2}(;[0-9]{1,2})?(;[0-9])?(m|K){1,2})?@@g"
    malathion · 2012-11-29 18:42:32 0

  • 0
    ls -l --color | less -R
    flarn2006 · 2016-05-07 17:19:56 0

  • -1
    cat input.txt | sed 's/\\\033[^a-zA-Z]*.//g'
    lingo · 2011-08-02 05:27:36 1

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