Commands tagged active directory (3)

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Set laptop display brightness
Run as root. Path may vary depending on laptop model and video card (this was tested on an Acer laptop with ATI HD3200 video). $ cat /proc/acpi/video/VGA/LCD/brightness to discover the possible values for your display.

Show the key code for keyboard events include the Fn keys
The keycodes are a result of pressing: Mute (Fn+F1) a

Color STDERR in output
This command will take the output of a command and color any STDERR output as a different color (red outline in this case)

Monitor the queries being run by MySQL

Getting a domain from url, ex: very nice to get url from squid access.log

pimp text output e.g. "Linux rocks!" to look nice

Rsync using SSH and outputing results to a text file
--delete will delete copies on remote to match local if deleted on local --stats will output the results -z zip -a archive -A preserve ACL -x don't cross filesystem boundaries -h human readable -e specify the remote shell to use

create a backup for all directories from current dir
Create backup (.tar.gz) for all first-level directory from current dir.

List open files that have no links to them on the filesystem
I have come across a situation in the past where someone has unlinked a file by running an 'rm' command against it while it was still being written to by a running process. The problem manifested itself when a 'df' command showed a filesystem at 100%, but this did not match the total value of a 'du -sk *'. When this happens, the process continues to write to the file but you can no longer see the file on the filesystem. Stopping and starting the process will, more often than not, get rid of the unlinked file, however this is not always possible on a live server. When you are in this situation you can use the 'lsof' command above to get the PID of the process that owns the file (in the sample output this is 23521). Run the following command to see a sym-link to the file (marked as deleted): $ cd /proc/23521/fd && ls -l Truncate the sym-link to regain your disk space: $ > /proc/23521/fd/3 I should point out that this is pretty brutal and *could* potentially destabilise your system depending on what process the file belongs to that you are truncating.

clean up syntax and de-obfuscate perl script
the command show can be run in vim, here is the same thing on the command line $ cat script.pl | perl -MO=Deparse | perltidy


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