Commands tagged plot (4)

  • Will track your mouse and save it to a file. You can use gnuplot to graph it: gnuplot -persist <(echo "unset key;unset border;unset yzeroaxis;unset xtics;unset ytics;unset ztics;plot './mouse-tracking' with points lt 1 pt 6 ps variable")


    4
    while true; do xdotool getmouselocation | sed 's/x:\(.*\) y:\(.*\) screen:.*/\1, \2/' >> ./mouse-tracking; sleep 10; done
    matthewbauer · 2010-02-27 04:00:13 0
  • See: http://imgur.com/JgjK2.png for example. Do some serious benchmarking from the commandline. This will write to a file with the time it took to compress n bytes to the file (increasing by 1). Run: gnuplot -persist <(echo "plot 'lzma' with lines, 'gzip' with lines, 'bzip2' with lines") To see it in graph form.


    3
    for a in bzip2 lzma gzip;do echo -n>$a;for b in $(seq 0 256);do dd if=/dev/zero of=$b.zero bs=$b count=1;c=$(date +%s%N);$a $b.zero;d=$(date +%s%N);total=$(echo $d-$c|bc);echo $total>>$a;rm $b.zero *.bz2 *.lzma *.gz;done;done
    matthewbauer · 2009-10-20 01:00:51 2
  • Log a command's votes, then run: gnuplot -persist <(echo "plot 'votes' with lines")


    0
    while true; do curl -s http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/3643/log-a-commands-votes | grep 'id="num-votes-' | sed 's;.*id="num-votes-[0-9]*">\([0-9\-]*\)</div>;\1;' >> votes; sleep 10; done
    matthewbauer · 2009-09-26 00:55:24 0
  • WIDTHL=10 and WIDTHR=60 are setting the widths of the left and the right column/bar. BAR="12345678" etc. is used to create a 80 char long string of "="s. I didn't know any shorter way. If you want to pipe results into it, wrap the whole thing in ( ... ) I know that printing bar graphs can be done rather easily by other means. Here, I was looking for a Bash only variant. Show Sample Output


    0
    SCALE=3; WIDTHL=10; WIDTHR=60; BAR="12345678"; BAR="${BAR//?/==========}"; while read LEFT RIGHT rest ; do RIGHT=$((RIGHT/SCALE)); printf "%${WIDTHL}s: %-${WIDTHR}s\n" "${LEFT:0:$WIDTHL}" "|${BAR:0:$RIGHT}*"; done < dataset.dat
    andreasS · 2011-08-22 19:35:21 0

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