Commands tagged dangerous (5)

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Query an NFS host for its list of exports

Move items from subdirectories to current directory
Find every file and move it to current directory.

Happy New Year!

List just the executable files (or directories) in current directory
With zsh.

Simple Video Surveillance by email
This takes a picture (with the web cam) every 5 minutes, and send the picture to your e-mail. Some systems support mail -a "References: " so that all video surveillance emails are grouped in a single email thread. To keep your inbox clean, it is still possible to filter and move to trash video surveillance emails (and restore these emails only if you really get robbed!) For instance with Gmail, emails sent to [email protected] can be filtered with "Matches: DeliveredTo:[email protected]"

List mp3 files with less than 320 kbps bitrate.

Convert decimal numbers to binary
Convert some decimal numbers to binary numbers. You could also build a general base-converter: $ function convBase { echo "ibase=$1; obase=$2; $3" | bc; } then you could write $ function decToBun { convBase 10 2 $1; }

ionice limits process I/O, to keep it from swamping the system (Linux)
This command is somewhat similar to 'nice', but constrains I/O usage rather than CPU usage. In particular, the '-c3' flag tells the OS to only allow the process to do I/O when nothing else is pending. This dramatically increases the responsiveness of the rest of the system if the process is doing heavy I/O. There's also a '-p' flag, to set the priority of an already-running process.

Validate date, also a date within a leap year
Important to know: a valid date will return 0, otherwise 1!

Show all detected mountable Drives/Partitions/BlockDevices
Yields entries in the form of "/dev/hda1" etc. Use this if you are on a new system and don't know how the storage hardware (ide, sata, scsi, usb - with ever changing descriptors) is connected and which partitions are available. Far better than using "fdisk -l" on guessed device descriptors.


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