Commands tagged oernii (7)

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create a simple version of ls with extended output
create a short alias for 'ls' with multi-column (-C), file type syntax additions (slashes after directories, @ for symlinks, etc... (-F), long format (-l), including hidden directories (all ./, ../, .svn, etc) (-a), show file-system blocks actually in use (-s), human readable file sizes (-h)

Show a config file without comments

Remove text from file1 which is in file2 and stores it in an other file
This command compares file2 with file1 and removes the lines that are in file1 from file2. Handy if you have a file where file1 was the origional and you want to remove the origional data from your file2.

Get CPU thermal data on MacOS

execute your commands hiding secret bits from history records
$ wget --user=username --password="$password" http://example.org/ Instead of hiding commands entirely from history, I prefer to use "read" to put the password into a variable, and then use that variable in the commands instead of the password. Without the "-e" and "-s" it should work in any bourne-type shell, but the -s is what makes sure the password doesn't get echoed to the screen at all. (-e makes editing work a bit better)

Execute a command with the last parameter of a previous command
Suppose that you had change in a directory like /home/user/mycode/code, and now you need to list it, instead of type entire path again, use ls !$ to recall path and list. Useful with many commands, this is only an example. (In this case, same result can be achivied with ls .)

delay execution of a command that needs lots of memory and CPU time until the resources are available
[ 2000 -ge "$(free -m | awk '/buffers.cache:/ {print $4}')" ] returns true if less than 2000 MB of RAM are available, so adjust this number to your needs. [ $(echo "$(uptime | awk '{print $10}' | sed -e 's/,$//' -e 's/,/./') >= $(grep -c ^processor /proc/cpuinfo)" | bc) -eq 1 ] returns true if the current machine load is at least equal to the number of CPUs. If either of the tests returns true we wait 10 seconds and check again. If both tests return false, i.e. 2GB are available and machine load falls below number of CPUs, we start our command and save it's output in a text file. The ( ( ... ) & ) construct lets the command run in background even if we log out. See http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/3115/ .

List status of your git repos and let us know if there is any new files to commit.
Source: http://www.bashoneliners.com/oneliners/oneliner/225/

follow the content of all files in a directory
The `-q' arg forces tail to not output the name of the current file

Say something out loud
Whatever arguments you pass will be spoken out loud. (Put it in a script or shell function.)


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