Commands tagged autossh (2)

  • Only useful for really flakey connections (but im stuck with one for now). Though if youre in this situation ive found this to be a good way to run autossh and it does a pretty good job of detecting when the session is down and restarting. Combined with the -t and screen commands this pops you back into your working session lickety split w/ as few headaches as possible. And if autossh is a bit slow at detecting the downed ssh connection, just run this in another tab/terminal window to notify autossh that it should drop it and start over. Basically for when polling is too slow. kill -SIGUSR1 `pgrep autossh` Show Sample Output


    11
    AUTOSSH_POLL=1 autossh -M 21010 hostname -t 'screen -Dr'
    iamarchimedes · 2009-10-11 06:04:29 0
  • - port 8080 on localhost will be a SOCKSv5 proxy - at localhost:localport1 you will be connected to the external source server1:remoteport1 and at bind_address2:localport2 to server2:remoteport2 - you will be using only IPv4 and arcfour/blowfish-cbc, in order to speed up the tunnel - if you lose the connection, autossh will resume it at soon as possible - the tunnel is here a background process, wiithout any terminal window open


    4
    autossh -M 0 -p 22 -C4c arcfour,blowfish-cbc -NfD 8080 -2 -L localport1:server1:remoteport1 -L bind_address2:localport2:server2:remoteport2 user@sshserver
    dddddsadasdasd · 2010-11-13 23:49:09 0

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