Commands tagged uuencode (6)

  • This takes a picture (with the web cam) every 5 minutes, and send the picture to your e-mail. Some systems support mail -a "References: " so that all video surveillance emails are grouped in a single email thread. To keep your inbox clean, it is still possible to filter and move to trash video surveillance emails (and restore these emails only if you really get robbed!) For instance with Gmail, emails sent to me+trash@gmail.com can be filtered with "Matches: DeliveredTo:me+trash@gmail.com" Show Sample Output


    2
    while true ; do fswebcam -d /dev/video0 -r 1280x1024 -F 15 - | uuencode $(date +\%Y\%m\%d\%H\%M).jpeg | mail -s "Video surveillance" me@gmail.com ; sleep 300 ; done
    pascalv · 2016-08-09 14:22:45 10
  • I use it for embedding images in CSS for Stylish, the Firefox addon. Thought it might be useful to others.


    1
    uuencode -m $1 /dev/stdout | sed '1d' | sed '$d' | tr -d '\n' | xclip -selection clipboard
    caliburning · 2009-10-19 09:03:09 2
  • Nice command for when you don't have scp available for whatever reason. Works with binaries.


    0
    cat LOCALFILE | ssh HOST "cat > REMOTEFILE"
    eataudio · 2011-02-03 05:29:06 3
  • cat didn't seem to work with binaries to well for me, the above command seemed to do the trick. Opps should be pointed out its going through a "hop" box (which is why I was searching here in first place), only need the last bit (after the -t) if doing it directly from one box to another...


    0
    ssh username1@servername1 -t ssh username2@servername2 uuencode -m testfile1.tar - | uudecode > testfile1.tar
    djt78 · 2013-01-28 17:06:00 2

  • 0
    cat file | ssh user@remotehost "cat > file"
    luckyone777 · 2017-07-26 20:36:02 11
  • I have come across multiple situations where I could only get to a server from a very restrictive bounce point which would not allow file transfers. I was able to uuencode a file, copy the output to a text file over putty, and then uudecode the file to transfer it. This works with any kind of file. Show Sample Output


    -4
    uuencode -m <filename> <filename>
    leprasmurf · 2009-12-22 15:28:59 2

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Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Determine space taken by files of certain type
Just how much space are those zillions of database logs taking up ? How much will you gain on a compression rate of say 80% ? This little line gives you a good start for your calculations.

list files recursively by size

Recursively Add Changed Files to Subversion
Extracted from http://www.howtogeek.com/wiki/Recursively_Add_Changed_Files_to_Subversion

Find the package that installed a command

The command used by applications in OS X to determine whether a plist is "good". from Ed Marczak.
The check an entire folder is a one-liner: plutil -lint * | grep -v OK$ from Ed Marczak

Release memory used by the Linux kernel on caches
=1 --> to free pagecache =2 --> to free dentries and inodes =3 --> to free pagecache, dentries and inodes

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

get a mysqldump with a timestamp in the filename and gzip it all in one go
Performs a mysqldump and gzip-compresses the output file with a timestamp in the resulting dump file. Inspect the file for integrity or fun with this command afterward, if you desire: $ zcat mysqldump-2009-06-12-07.41.01.tgz | less

Create arbitrary big file full of zeroes but done in a second
If you want to create fast a very big file for testing purposes and you do not care about its content, then you can use this command to create a file of arbitrary size within less than a second. Content of file will be all zero bytes. The trick is that the content is just not written to the disk, instead the space for it is somehow reserved on operating system level and file system level. It would be filled when first accessed/written (not sure about the mechanism that lies below, but it makes the file creation super fast). Instead of '1G' as in the example, you could use other modifiers like 200K for kilobytes (1024 bytes), 500M for megabytes (1024 * 1024 bytes), 20G for Gigabytes (1024*1024*1024 bytes), 30T for Terabytes (1024^4 bytes). Also P for Penta, etc... Command tested under Linux.


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