Commands tagged uuencode (6)

  • This takes a picture (with the web cam) every 5 minutes, and send the picture to your e-mail. Some systems support mail -a "References: " so that all video surveillance emails are grouped in a single email thread. To keep your inbox clean, it is still possible to filter and move to trash video surveillance emails (and restore these emails only if you really get robbed!) For instance with Gmail, emails sent to me+trash@gmail.com can be filtered with "Matches: DeliveredTo:me+trash@gmail.com" Show Sample Output


    2
    while true ; do fswebcam -d /dev/video0 -r 1280x1024 -F 15 - | uuencode $(date +\%Y\%m\%d\%H\%M).jpeg | mail -s "Video surveillance" me@gmail.com ; sleep 300 ; done
    pascalv · 2016-08-09 14:22:45 0
  • I use it for embedding images in CSS for Stylish, the Firefox addon. Thought it might be useful to others.


    1
    uuencode -m $1 /dev/stdout | sed '1d' | sed '$d' | tr -d '\n' | xclip -selection clipboard
    caliburning · 2009-10-19 09:03:09 0
  • Nice command for when you don't have scp available for whatever reason. Works with binaries.


    0
    cat LOCALFILE | ssh HOST "cat > REMOTEFILE"
    eataudio · 2011-02-03 05:29:06 1
  • cat didn't seem to work with binaries to well for me, the above command seemed to do the trick. Opps should be pointed out its going through a "hop" box (which is why I was searching here in first place), only need the last bit (after the -t) if doing it directly from one box to another...


    0
    ssh username1@servername1 -t ssh username2@servername2 uuencode -m testfile1.tar - | uudecode > testfile1.tar
    djt78 · 2013-01-28 17:06:00 0

  • 0
    cat file | ssh user@remotehost "cat > file"
    luckyone777 · 2017-07-26 20:36:02 0
  • I have come across multiple situations where I could only get to a server from a very restrictive bounce point which would not allow file transfers. I was able to uuencode a file, copy the output to a text file over putty, and then uudecode the file to transfer it. This works with any kind of file. Show Sample Output


    -4
    uuencode -m <filename> <filename>
    leprasmurf · 2009-12-22 15:28:59 0

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Setting global redirection of STDERR to STDOUT in a script
You have a script where =ALL= STDERR should be redirected to STDIN and you don't want to add "2>&1" at the end of each command... E.G.: $ ls -al /foo/bar 2>&1 Than just add this piece of code at the beginning of your script! I hope this can help someone. :)

Weather on the Command line
Get your weather from a weather station just blocks from your home. Go to http://www.wunderground.com/wundermap/ and find a weather station near you. Click on a temperature bubble for that area. When the window pops up, click on hypertext link with the station ID, then on the bottom right of the page, click on the Current Conditions XML. Thats your link! Good luck!

vim insert current filename
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Throttling Bandwidth On A Mac
sudo ipfw pipe 1 config bw 50KByte/s Set the bandwidth (bw) limit to any number you want. For example you could have a 15kb pipe for X application and then a 100kb pipe for another application and attach things to those pipes. If a port isn’t attached to a pipe, it runs at full speed. Change the number (in this case 1) to a different number for a different pipe. The next step is to attach your port. sudo ipfw add 1 pipe 1 src-port 80 In this case anything on port 80 (http) will be set to a limit of 50Kbyte/s. If you want to attach a second port to this pipe, repeat the command but change the port number at the end. src : http://www.mactricksandtips.com/2008/12/throttling-bandwidth-on-a-mac.html

Open Remote Desktop (RDP) from command line having a custom screen size
This example uses xfreerdp, which builds upon the development of rdesktop. This example usage will also send you the remote machine's sound.

use screen as a terminal emulator to connect to serial consoles
Use GNU/screen as a terminal emulator for anything serial console related. screen /dev/tty eg. screen /dev/ttyS0 9600 MacOSX: http://www.macosxhints.com/article.php?story=20061109133825654 Cheat Sheet: http://www.catonmat.net/blog/screen-terminal-emulator-cheat-sheet/

Quickly get summary of sizes for files and folders
Use this as a quick and simple alternative to the slightly verbose "du -s --max-depth=1"

Set laptop display brightness
Run as root. Path may vary depending on laptop model and video card (this was tested on an Acer laptop with ATI HD3200 video). $ cat /proc/acpi/video/VGA/LCD/brightness to discover the possible values for your display.

find and reduce 8x parallel the size of PNG images without loosing quality via optipng

Quickly add user accounts to the system and force a password change on first login
This command is a bit Linux specific, as --stdin doesn't exist for passwd on many Unix machines. Further, useradd is high level in most distributions and Unix derivatives except for the Debian family of distros, where adduser would be more appropriate. The last bit, with chage, will force the user to change their password on new login.


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