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Find usb device
I often use it to find recently added ou removed device, or using find in /dev, or anything similar. Just run the command, plug the device, and wait to see him and only him

Query Wikipedia via console over DNS

Resize A Mounted EXT3 File System
Live extension of an ext3 file system on logical volume $v by 200GB without the need to unmount/remount. Requires that you have 1) a version of resize2fs that contains code merged from ext2online, and 2) kernel support for online resizing. (e.g. RHEL 5)

Trick find -exec option to execute alias
An alias cannot be executed as command in a find -exec line. This form will trick the command line and let you do the job.

Debug a remote php application (behind firewall) using ssh tunnel for XDEBUG port 9000
If you need to xdebug a remote php application, which is behind a firewall, and you have an ssh daemon running on that machine. you can redirect port 9000 on that machine over to your local machine from which you run your xdebug client (I am using phpStorm) So, run this command on your local machine and start your local xdebug client, to start debugging. more info: http://code.google.com/p/spectator/wiki/Installing

Inverted cowsay
It's quite fun to invert text using "flip.pl" (ref: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2078323 ). Slightly more challenging is to flip a whole "cowsay". :-)

Monitor a file's size

grep across a git repo and open matching files in gedit

infile search and replace on N files (including backup of the files)
the addition of ".bk" to the regular "pie" idiom makes perl create a backup of every file with the extension ".bk", in case it b0rks something and you want it back

Use "most" as your man pager
you should have the "most" package installed. I like it because it is colorful and easier to read. alternatively you can use "less" instead of "most". you can also add this to your ~/.bashrc to make it permanent.


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