Commands using acpi (12)


  • 3
    acpi -tc
    hypnojazz · 2009-03-29 22:27:31 2
  • The original proc file doesn't exist on my system. Show Sample Output


    3
    acpi -b
    dbbolton · 2010-06-10 23:23:16 1
  • There is no need for variables. I also added sleep to reduce cpu usage, however I didn't test it.


    3
    while :; do acpi -t | osd_cat -p bottom ; sleep 1; done &
    John_W · 2011-01-14 13:57:45 4
  • My firefox overheats my cpu, sometimes above 90 degrees Celsius ( hence the name? ) To keep an eye on temperature, I put this command inside KAlarm ( a kind of cron) to be repeated every minute, for 5 seconds, color red ( default for osd_cat). Its pretty, ultra small, displays a micro 2 lines text on every desktop and over everything and do not steal focus or interrupt any task. I get the information passively, in the low profile bottom of the screen. Of course you can use it inside a terminal. Just do it: watch -n 60 'acpi -t | osd_cat -p bottom'


    2
    acpi -t | osd_cat -p bottom
    m33600 · 2009-10-23 05:22:01 0
  • works best in a shell script run at startup. It will ping localhost once and output to null, after it does that, acpi is called for temperature in fahrenheit and piped through to another loop that feeds notify-send for a tooltip. After waiting five minutes, it will start over. Show Sample Output


    2
    while ping -c 1 127.0.0.1 > /dev/null; do acpi -t -f | while read tem; do notify-send "$tem"; done; sleep 300; done
    c0de · 2011-07-02 06:47:25 2
  • This time I added a print to reemaining energy, every minute, time stamped. The example shown here is complete and point to large discrepancies as time passes, converging to accuracy near the end. Show Sample Output


    1
    echo start > battery.txt; watch -n 60 'date >> battery.txt ; acpi -b >> battery.txt'
    m33600 · 2009-10-19 05:28:15 0

  • 1
    acpi -V
    vajorie · 2010-06-09 14:23:08 0

  • 1
    acpi -a
    wiburg · 2010-06-12 20:07:27 0
  • No need for a colon, and one less semicolon too. Also untested.


    1
    while sleep 1; do acpi -t | osd_cat -p bottom; done &
    linuts · 2011-01-14 23:22:57 0
  • This prints "Charging" or "Discharging". Obviously, this will indicate the status of the AC adapter. The awk part could be from 1-6. I removed the comma because it is useless when only looking at one element of the output array. See acpi(1) for more info.


    0
    acpi -b | sed 's/,//g' | awk '{print $3}'
    dbbolton · 2010-06-11 05:32:57 0

  • -2
    acpi | cut -d '%' -f1 | cut -d ',' -f2
    sn0opy · 2009-02-16 13:36:01 3
  • Checks whether your power supply is still plugged in. If not it will trigger an alarm at maximum volume. Show Sample Output


    -3
    check(){ power=$(acpi -a) ; if [[ $power == *on-line* ]] ; then echo "supply is on"; else echo "somebody is steeling your laptop"; amixer -c0 set Master 100+ unmute ; mpg123 nuclear-alarm.mp3 ; fi } ;while true; do check ; sleep 2 ; done
    hoodie · 2011-12-10 13:42:52 0

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