Commands using at (30)

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Merge several pdf files into a single file

Calculate days on which Friday the 13th occurs
Simply change the years listed in the first seq, and it will print out all the months in that span of years that have Friday the 13ths in them.

rename files according to date created
The command renames all files in a certain directory. Renaming them to their date of creation using EXIF. If you're working with JPG that contains EXIF data (ie. from digital camera), then you can use following to get the creation date instead of stat. * Since not every file has exif data, we want to check that dst is valid before doing the rest of commands. * The output from exif has a space, which is a PITA for filenames. Use sed to replace with '-'. * Note that I use 'echo' before the mv to test out my scripts. When you're confident that it's doing the right thing, then you can remove the 'echo'... you don't want to end up like the guy that got all the files blown away. Credits: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/4710753/rename-files-according-to-date-created

Replace duplicate files by hardlinks
This variation can handle file paths containing spaces.

delete PBS jobs based on strings from qstat output

shutdown pc in 4 hours without needing to keep terminal open / user logged in.
From the 'disown' man page: disown prevents the current shell from sending a HUP signal to each of the given jobs when the current shell terminates a login session.

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Split and join with split and cat.
`split -b 1k file` splits files into 1k chunks. Rejoin them with `cat x* > file`.

exit if another instance is running
runs only one instance.

Get line count for any file ending with extension recursively rooted at the current directory.


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