Commands using awk (1,302)

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Extract extention of a file

Copy all documents PDF in disk for your home directory
I used this to copy all PDFs recursively to a selected dir

Prints total line count contribution per user for an SVN repository
I'm working in a group project currently and annoyed at the lack of output by my teammates. Wanting hard metrics of how awesome I am and how awesome they aren't, I wrote this command up. It will print a full repository listing of all files, remove the directories which confuse blame, run svn blame on each individual file, and tally the resulting line counts. It seems quite slow, depending on your repository location, because blame must hit the server for each individual file. You can remove the -R on the first part to print out the tallies for just the current directory.

List programs with open ports and connections

Colorized grep in less
Get your colorized grep output in less(1). This involves two things: forcing grep to output colors even though it's not going to a terminal and telling less to handle those properly.

Run a command if today is the last day of the month
This is handy to just shove into a daily cron entry. If you do use cron, make sure to escape the %d with \%d or it will fail.

Convert all WMF images to SVG recursively ignoring file extension case
This assumes you have the package installed necessary for converting WMF files. On my Ubuntu box, this is libwmf-bin. I used this command, as libwmf is not on my wife's iMac, so I archived the directories containing the WMF files from OS X, ran them on my Ubuntu box, archived the resulting SVGs, and sent them back to her. Quick, simple and to the point. Searches directories recursively looking for extensions ignoring case. This is much more readable and clean than -exec for find. The while loop also gives further flexibility on complex logic. Also, although there is 'wmf2svg --auto', it expects lowercase extensions, and not uppercase. Because I want to ignore case, I need to use the -o option instead. Works in ZSH and BASH. Haven't tested in other shells.

Rename files in batch

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Check if your ISP is intercepting DNS queries
It's somewhat common ISPs to intercept DNS queries at port 53 and resolve them at their own. To check if your ISP is intercepting your DNS queries just type this command in the terminal. "#.abc" it's an OK answer. But if you get something like "I am not an OpenDNS resolver.", yep, you are beign cheated by your ISP.


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