Commands using cal (23)

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Format ps command output
ps command gives the possibility to display information with custom formatting with the -o options followed by the format specifier list.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Print all lines between two line numbers
Print all lines between two line numbers This command uses sed(1) to print all lines between two known line numbers in a file. Useful for seeing output in a log file, where the line numbers are known. The above command will print all lines between, and including, lines 3 and 6.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Directory Tree
tree has lots of parms - man is your friend

Prints total line count contribution per user for an SVN repository
make usable on OSX with filenames containing spaces. note: will still break if filenames contain newlines... possible, but who does that?!

Search for a string inside all files in the current directory
shorter typing with no need to use xargs.

Count the frequency of every word for a given file
Counts the frequency of words in a file

Get your outgoing IP address

Find usb device
I often use it to find recently added ou removed device, or using find in /dev, or anything similar. Just run the command, plug the device, and wait to see him and only him


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