Commands using cd (197)

  • Combines a few repetitive tasks when compiling source code. Especially useful when a hypen in a file-name breaks tab completion. 1.) wget source.tar.gz 2.) tar xzvf source.tar.gz 3.) cd source 4.) ls From there you can run ./configure, make and etc. Show Sample Output


    -1
    wtzc () { wget "$@"; foo=`echo "$@" | sed 's:.*/::'`; tar xzvf $foo; blah=`echo $foo | sed 's:,*/::'`; bar=`echo $blah | sed -e 's/\(.*\)\..*/\1/' -e 's/\(.*\)\..*/\1/'`; cd $bar; ls; }
    oshazard · 2010-01-17 11:25:47 0
  • _ expands to the last argument of the last command that was executed


    1
    mkdir dir; cd $_
    servermanaged · 2010-01-13 11:56:36 5
  • combines mkdir and cd added quotes around $_, thanx to flatcap! Show Sample Output


    -3
    echo 'mkcd() { mkdir -p "$@" && cd "$_"; }' >> ~/.bashrc
    phaidros · 2010-01-13 09:37:56 1
  • Instead of typing "cd ../../.." you can type ".. 3". For extremely lazy typists, you can add this alias: alias ...=".. 2" ....=".. 3" - so now you can write just .... !!! NB the .. function needs to be "source"d or included in your startup scripts, perhaps .bashrc.


    3
    function ..(){ for ((j=${1:-1},i=0;i<j;i++));do builtin cd ..;done;}
    bhepple · 2010-01-02 08:36:12 9
  • This command will set bash as the default shell for all users in a FreeBSD system.


    6
    cd /usr/home && for i in *;do chsh -s bash $i;done
    casidiablo · 2009-12-31 18:48:53 3
  • This is a kind of wrapper around the shell builtin cd that allows a person to quickly go up several directories. Instead of typing: cd ../.. A user can type: cd ... Instead of: cd ../../.. Type: cd .... Add another period and it goes up four levels. Adding more periods will take you up more levels.


    4
    cd() { if [[ "$1" =~ ^\.\.+$ ]];then local a dir;a=${#1};while [ $a -ne 1 ];do dir=${dir}"../";((a--));done;builtin cd $dir;else builtin cd "$@";fi ;}
    eightmillion · 2009-10-29 21:43:51 4
  • Can easily be scripted in order to show permission "tree" from any folder. Can also be formated with column -t { pushd .> /dev/null; cd /; for d in `echo $OLDPWD | sed -e 's/\// /g'`; do cd $d; echo -n "$d "; ls -ld .; done; popd >/dev/null ; } | column -t from http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/3731/using-column-to-format-a-directory-listing Show Sample Output


    0
    pushd .> /dev/null; cd /; for d in `echo $OLDPWD | sed -e 's/\// /g'`; do cd $d; echo -n "$d "; ls -ld .; done; popd >/dev/null
    syladmin · 2009-10-22 12:32:11 0
  • Another way of doing it that's a bit clearer. I'm a fan of readable code.


    7
    script_path=$(cd $(dirname $0);pwd)
    jgc · 2009-10-14 16:04:03 3

  • 3
    PATH=$(cd ${0%/*}; pwd)
    hons · 2009-10-13 16:02:31 1
  • Perfect time for the rarely used sub shell.


    -4
    ( cd /my/directory; xterm& )
    ashawley · 2009-10-13 13:07:21 0
  • gitstart ~/path/to/dir Initialized empty Git repository in /home/user/path/to/dir/.git/


    0
    gitstart () { if ! [[ -d "$@" ]]; then mkdir -p "$@" && cd "$@" && git init; else cd "$@" && git init; fi }
    xyz · 2009-09-28 01:12:32 0
  • record audio notes or meetings requires arecord and lame run mp3gain on the resulting file to increase the volume / quality ctrl-c to stop recording Show Sample Output


    11
    arecord -q -f cd -r 44100 -c2 -t raw | lame -S -x -h -b 128 - `date +%Y%m%d%H%M`.mp3
    oracular · 2009-09-25 05:32:52 2
  • How often do you make a directory (or series of directories) and then change into it to do whatever? 99% of the time that is what I do. This BASH function 'md' will make the directory path then immediately change to the new directory. By using the 'mkdir -p' switch, the intermediate directories are created as well if they do not exist. Show Sample Output


    30
    md () { mkdir -p "$@" && cd "$@"; }
    drewk · 2009-09-24 16:09:19 5
  • Using tape archive create a tar file in Stdout (-) and pipe that into a compound command to extract the tar file from Stdin at the destination. This similar to "Copy via tar pipe ...", but copies across file systems boundaries. I prefer to use cp -pr for copying within the same file system. Show Sample Output


    -2
    tar cpof - src |( cd des; tar xpof -)
    davidpotter42 · 2009-09-20 20:43:30 0
  • search argument in PATH accept grep expressions without args, list all binaries found in PATH Show Sample Output


    -1
    function sepath { echo $PATH |tr ":" "\n" |sort -u |while read L ; do cd "$L" 2>/dev/null && find . \( ! -name . -prune \) \( -type f -o -type l \) 2>/dev/null |sed "s@^\./@@" |egrep -i "${*}" |sed "s@^@$L/@" ; done ; }
    mobidyc · 2009-09-11 15:03:22 2
  • fcd : file change directory A bash function that takes a fully qualified file path and cd's into the directory where it lives. Useful on the commadline when you have a file name in a variable and you'd like to cd to the directory to RCS check it in or look at other files associated with it. Will run on any ksh, bash, likely sh, maybe zsh. Show Sample Output


    1
    function fcd () { [ -f $1 ] && { cd $(dirname $1); } || { cd $1 ; } pwd }
    relay · 2009-09-03 18:58:13 0
  • Using a GUI file managers you can merge directories (cut and paste). This command roughly does the same (it doesn't ask for confirmation (no problem for me) and it doesn't clean up the empty SRC directories (no problem, trivial). probably does the same: cp -l SRC TARGET; rm -rf SRC


    0
    (cd SRC; find . -type d -exec mkdir TARGET/{} ";"; find . -type f -exec mv {} TARGET/{} ";")
    karel1980 · 2009-08-17 12:35:48 4
  • diff is designed to compare two files. You can also compare directories. In this form, bash uses 'process substitution' in place of a file as an input to diff. Each input to diff can be filtered as you choose. I use find and egrep to select the files to compare.


    3
    diff <(cd /path-1; find . -type f -print | egrep -i '\.m4a$|\.mp3$') <(cd /path-2; find . f -print | egrep -i '\.m4a$|\.mp3$')
    drewk · 2009-08-17 00:49:31 1

  • 5
    cd `dirname $_`
    amaymon · 2009-08-07 07:08:31 0
  • Uses the last argument of the last executed command, and gets the directory name from it. Use $!:t for the filename alone, without the dirname. Show Sample Output


    25
    cd !$:h
    lingo · 2009-08-07 00:37:08 2
  • Just a copy of a big dir when you wan't things like ownership and date etc etc to be untouched. Note: Updated with the ideas from "mpb".


    1
    tar cf - dir_to_cp/ | (cd path_to_put/ && tar xvf -)
    jsiei97 · 2009-08-04 16:51:31 3
  • Just copy and paste the code in your terminal. Note : sudo apt-get for debian versions , change as per your requirement . Source : www.h3manth.com


    -6
    sudo wget -c "http://nmap.org/dist/nmap-5.00.tar.bz2" && bzip2 -cd nmap-5.00.tar.bz2 | tar xvf - && cd nmap-5.00 && ./configure && make && sudo make install
    hemanth · 2009-07-26 11:36:53 3
  • This command will generate "CHECK TABLE `db_name.table_name` ;" statements for all tables present in databases on a MySQL server, which can be piped into the mysql command. (Can also be altered to perform OPTIMIZE and REPAIR functions.) Tested on MySQL 4.x and 5.x systems in a Linux environment under bash. Show Sample Output


    -1
    DD=`cat /etc/my.cnf | sed "s/#.*//g;" | grep datadir | tr '=' ' ' | gawk '{print $2;}'` && ( cd $DD ; find . -mindepth 2 | grep -v db\.opt | sed 's/\.\///g; s/\....$//g; s/\//./;' | sort | uniq | tr '/' '.' | gawk '{print "CHECK TABLE","`"$1"`",";";}' )
    atcroft · 2009-07-25 03:42:31 1
  • the f is for file and - stdout, This way little shorter. I Like copy-directory function It does the job but looks like SH**, and this doesn't understand folders with whitespaces and can only handle full path, but otherwise fine, function copy-directory () { ; FrDir="$(echo $1 | sed 's:/: :g' | awk '/ / {print $NF}')" ; SiZe="$(du -sb $1 | awk '{print $1}')" ; (cd $1 ; cd .. ; tar c $FrDir/ )|pv -s $SiZe|(cd $2 ; tar x ) ; } Show Sample Output


    -11
    (cd /source/dir ; tar cv .)|(cd /dest/dir ; tar xv)
    marssi · 2009-07-19 10:31:13 6

  • -3
    (cd /source/dir ; tar cvf - .)|(cd /dest/dir ; tar xvpf -)
    tkunz · 2009-07-14 20:03:23 0
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