Commands using column (42)

  • -P uses the POSIX output format, which makes information on each file system always printed on exactly one line. "column -t" makes a table from the input. Show Sample Output


    19
    df -P | column -t
    fossilet · 2011-04-09 13:12:46 5

  • -1
    egrep '__NR_' /usr/include/asm/unistd_`getconf -a | awk '$1~/^WORD/{print $2}'`.h | sed -e 's/^#define __NR_//' | column -t
    cicatriz · 2011-03-04 15:09:40 0
  • The exported TSV file of Google Adwords' first five columns are text, they usually should collapse into one cell, a multi-line text cell, but there is no guaranteed way to represent line-break within cells for .tsv file format, thus Google split it to 5 columns. The problem is, with 5 columns of text, there are hardly space to put additional fields while maintain printable output. This script collapses the first five columns of each row into one single multi-line text cell, for console output or direct send to printer.


    -1
    awk -F $'\t' '{printf $1 LS $2 LS $3 LS $4 LS $5; for (i = 7; i < NF; i++) printf $i "\t"; printf "\n--\n";}' LS=$'\n' 'Ad report.tsv' | column -t -s $'\t'
    zhangweiwu · 2011-02-28 10:52:16 0

  • 0
    l=10;for((i=0;i<$l;i++));do eval "a$i=($(pv=1;v=1;for((j=0;j<$l;j++));do [ $i -eq 0 -o $j -eq 0 ]&&{ v=1 && pv=1; }||v=$((pv+a$((i-1))[$((j))]));echo -n "$v ";pv=$v;done;));";eval "echo \"\${a$i[@]}\"";done | column -t;
    glaudiston · 2011-02-11 17:00:20 7
  • This one-liner will output installed packages sorted by size in Kilobytes. Show Sample Output


    4
    paste <(pacman -Q | awk '{ print $1; }' | xargs pacman -Qi | grep 'Size' | awk '{ print $4$5; }') <(pacman -Q | awk '{print $1; }') | sort -n | column -t
    BruceLEET · 2011-01-07 18:43:18 0
  • I like the other three versions but one uses nested loops and another prints every color on a separate line. Both versions fail to reset colors before giving the prompt back. This version uses the column command to print a table so all the colors fit on one screen. It also resets colors back to normal before as a last step.


    9
    for i in {0..255}; do echo -e "\e[38;05;${i}m${i}"; done | column -c 80 -s ' '; echo -e "\e[m"
    cout · 2010-07-21 17:30:36 1
  • This shows every bit of information that stat can get for any file, dir, fifo, etc. It's great because it also shows the format and explains it for each format option. If you just want stat help, create this handy alias 'stath' to display all format options with explanations. alias stath="stat --h|sed '/Th/,/NO/!d;/%/!d'" To display on 2 lines: ( F=/etc/screenrc N=c IFS=$'\n'; for L in $(sed 's/%Z./%Z\n/'<<<`stat --h|sed -n '/^ *%/s/^ *%\(.\).*$/\1:%\1/p'`); do G=$(echo "stat -$N '$L' \"$F\""); eval $G; N=fc;done; ) For a similarly powerful stat-like function optimized for pretty output (and can sort by any field), check out the "lll" function http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/5815/advanced-ls-output-using-find-for-formattedsortable-file-stat-info From my .bash_profile -> http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html Show Sample Output


    3
    statt(){ C=c;stat --h|sed '/Th/,/NO/!d;/%/!d'|while read l;do p=${l/% */};[ $p == %Z ]&&C=fc&&echo ^FS:^;echo "`stat -$C $p \"$1\"` ^$p^${l#%* }";done|column -ts^; }
    AskApache · 2010-06-11 23:31:03 0
  • Once you get into advanced/optimized scripts, functions, or cli usage, you will use the sort command alot. The options are difficult to master/memorize however, and when you use sort commands as much as I do (some examples below), it's useful to have the help available with a simple alias. I love this alias as I never seem to remember all the options for sort, and I use sort like crazy (much better than uniq for example). # Sorts by file permissions find . -maxdepth 1 -printf '%.5m %10M %p\n' | sort -k1 -r -g -bS 20% 00761 drwxrw---x ./tmp 00755 drwxr-xr-x . 00701 drwx-----x ./askapache-m 00644 -rw-r--r-- ./.htaccess # Shows uniq history fast history 1000 | sed 's/^[0-9 ]*//' | sort -fubdS 50% exec bash -lxv export TERM=putty-256color Taken from my http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html Show Sample Output


    3
    alias sorth='sort --help|sed -n "/^ *-[^-]/s/^ *\(-[^ ]* -[^ ]*\) *\(.*\)/\1:\2/p"|column -ts":"'
    AskApache · 2010-06-10 21:30:31 0
  • If you have used bash for any scripting, you've used the date command alot. It's perfect for using as a way to create filename's dynamically within aliases,functions, and commands like below.. This is actually an update to my first alias, since a few commenters (below) had good observations on what was wrong with my first command. # creating a date-based ssh-key for askapache.github.com ssh-keygen -f ~/.ssh/`date +git-$USER@$HOSTNAME-%m-%d-%g` -C 'webmaster@askapache.com' # /home/gpl/.ssh/git-gplnet@askapache.github.com-04-22-10 # create a tar+gzip backup of the current directory tar -czf $(date +$HOME/.backups/%m-%d-%g-%R-`sed -u 's/\//#/g' <<< $PWD`.tgz) . # tar -czf /home/gpl/.backups/04-22-10-01:13-#home#gpl#.rr#src.tgz . I personally find myself having to reference date --help quite a bit as a result. So this nice alias saves me a lot of time. This is one bdash mofo. Works in sh and bash (posix), but will likely need to be changed for other shells due to the parameter substitution going on.. Just extend the sed command, I prefer sed to pretty much everything anyways.. but it's always preferable to put in the extra effort to go for as much builtin use as you can. Otherwise it's not a top one-liner, it's a lazyboy recliner. Here's the old version: alias dateh='date --help|sed "/^ *%%/,/^ *%Z/!d;s/ \+/ /g"|while read l;do date "+ %${l/% */}_${l/% */}_${l#* }";done|column -s_ -t' This trick from my [ http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html bash_profile ] Show Sample Output


    21
    alias dateh='date --help|sed -n "/^ *%%/,/^ *%Z/p"|while read l;do F=${l/% */}; date +%$F:"|'"'"'${F//%n/ }'"'"'|${l#* }";done|sed "s/\ *|\ */|/g" |column -s "|" -t'
    AskApache · 2010-04-21 01:22:18 5
  • Prints a log of phonecalls placed from/to an asterisk server, formated into an easily readable table. You can use partial number/queue matches, or use .* to match everything. Show Sample Output


    3
    phonelogs() { grep "$1" /var/log/asterisk/cdr-csv/Master.csv | cut -d',' -f 2,3,11,12 --output-delimiter=" " | sed 's/"//g' | cut -d' ' -f 1,2,3,4,6 | column -t; }
    SuperJediWombat · 2010-03-28 08:30:46 0
  • ifconfig can't properly display interface's name longer 9 symbols,also it can't show IPs added thru ip command, so 'ip' should be used instead. This alias properly shows long names, bond interfaces and all interface aliases. loopback interface is ignored, since its IP is obvious Show Sample Output


    4
    alias ips='ip a | awk '\''/inet /&&!/ lo/{print $NF,$2}'\'' | column -t'
    zolden · 2010-03-06 20:33:04 0
  • Will handle pretty much all types of CSV Files. The ^M character is typed on the command line using Ctrl-V Ctrl-M and can be replaced with any character that does not appear inside the CSV. Tips for simpler CSV files: * If newlines are not placed within a csv cell then you can replace `map(repr, r)` with r Show Sample Output


    1
    python -c 'import sys,csv; c = csv.reader(sys.stdin); [sys.stdout.write("^M".join(map(repr,r))+"\n") for r in c];' <tmp/test.csv | column -s '^M' -t
    pykler · 2010-02-01 14:57:25 1

  • 1
    /sbin/ip -f inet addr | sed -rn 's/.*inet ([^ ]+).*(eth[[:digit:]]*(:[[:digit:]]+)?)/\2 \1/p' | column -t
    owen · 2009-12-17 19:48:28 0
  • Using column to format a directory listing Show Sample Output


    3
    (printf "PERMISSIONS LINKS OWNER GROUP SIZE MONTH DAY HH:MM PROG-NAME\n" \ ; ls -l | sed 1d) | column -t
    opexxx · 2009-10-08 11:53:38 1
  • Splits the input based on commas and prints it in a nice column format. This would not work for CSV rows that have "," between quotes or with newline characters. Use only simple simple csv files. Show Sample Output


    18
    column -s, -t <tmp.csv
    pykler · 2009-09-24 20:57:32 0
  • since fuse mounts do not appear in /etc/mtab (fuse can't write there, dunno if it would if it could) this is propably a better way.


    10
    column -t /proc/mounts
    unixmonkey5049 · 2009-08-09 17:00:41 2
  • Particularly useful if you're mounting different drives, using the following command will allow you to see all the filesystems currently mounted on your computer and their respective specs with the added benefit of nice formatting. Show Sample Output


    295
    mount | column -t
    thechile · 2009-03-20 14:18:56 6
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