Commands using comm (11)

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Find all symlinks that link to directories

Use jq to validate and pretty-print json output
The `jq` tool can also be used do validate json files and pretty print output: ` jq < file.json` Available on several platforms, including newer debian-based systems via `#sudo apt install jq`, mac via `brew install jq`, and from source https://stedolan.github.io/jq/download/ This alternative to the original avoids the useless use of cat

Alias for quick command-line volume set (works also remotely via SSH)
If you're addicted to command-line solutions of ordinary actions or if you just want to set your volume from bed via mobile phone SSH, you can set this alias and use it as $ setvol 50 for setting volume on 50% gain Works only with ALSA, tested on Ubuntu 8.10. Give me some info about your experience. TIP: Try aslo command "mute" to toggle mute/unmute sound. But I don't know if this works on all distros.

Grep inside Vim and navigate results
Will search for the given pattern and build a list of occurrences. Then you can use :copen and :cclose to toggle the list. When browsing the list, ENTER will take you to that line in the file.

Killing processes with your mouse in an infinite loop
Useful for quickly cleaning your Desktop. Nice joke if launched at startup.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

grep expression (perl regex) to extract all ip addresses from both ip and ifconfig commands output
It uses the following GNU grep options: "-o" which shows only the matching part of the line and "-P" which allows the use of Perl regular expressions.

tail, with specific pattern colored

Shows all packages installed that are recommended by other packages
Shows the packages installed on your system that are recomemnded by other packages. You should remove these packages.

Quickly build ulimit command from current values
It is helpful to know the current limits placed on your account, and using this shortcut is a quick way to figuring out which values to change for optimization or security. Alias is: $ alias ulimith="command ulimit -a|sed 's/^.*\([a-z]\))\(.*\)$/-\1\2/;s/^/ulimit /'|tr '\n' ' ';echo" Here's the result of this command: $ ulimit -c 0 -d unlimited -e 0 -f unlimited -i 155648 -l 32 -m unlimited -n 8192 -p 8 -q 819200 -r 0 -s 10240 -t unlimited -u unlimited -v unlimited -x unlimited $ ulimit -a core file size (blocks, -c) 0 data seg size (kbytes, -d) unlimited scheduling priority (-e) 0 file size (blocks, -f) unlimited pending signals (-i) 155648 max locked memory (kbytes, -l) 32 max memory size (kbytes, -m) unlimited open files (-n) 8192 pipe size (512 bytes, -p) 8 POSIX message queues (bytes, -q) 819200 real-time priority (-r) 0 stack size (kbytes, -s) 10240 cpu time (seconds, -t) unlimited max user processes (-u) unlimited virtual memory (kbytes, -v) unlimited file locks (-x) unlimited


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