Commands using date (195)

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Change string in many files at once and more.
Find all files that contain string XXX in them, change the string from XXX to YYY, make a backup copy of the file and save a list of files changed in /tmp/fileschanged.

Don't save commands in bash history (only for current session)
Unsetting HISTFILE avoid getting current session history list saved.

show the real times iso of epochs for a given column
When you have one of those (log)files that only has epoch for time (since no one will ever look at them as a date) this is a way to get the human readable date/time and do further inspection. Mostly perl-fu :-/

restoring some data from a corrupted text file
man tac When there is a bad block in the middle of your file, you can see its begninning with `cat' and its end with `tac'. But both commands terminates with an error. So this sequence rebuilds a new file without badblock.

quickly backup or copy a file with bash

delete multiple files from git index that have already been deleted from disk
delete multiple files from git index that have already been deleted from disk. this is pretty terrible, I'm looking for a better way. (much better!! http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/1246/git-remove-files-which-have-been-deleted)

Run netcat to server files of current folder

See your current RAM frequency

Create a mirror of a local folder, on a remote server
Create a exact mirror of the local folder "/root/files", on remote server 'remote_server' using SSH command (listening on port 22) (all files & folders on destination server/folder will be deleted)

Compression formats Benchmark
See: http://imgur.com/JgjK2.png for example. Do some serious benchmarking from the commandline. This will write to a file with the time it took to compress n bytes to the file (increasing by 1). Run: $ gnuplot -persist


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