Commands using dd (167)

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move you up one directory quickly
In bash, this turns on auto cd. If a command is just a directory name, it cd's into that directory.

ThePirateBay.org torrent search
usage: tpb searchterm example: tpb the matrix trilogy This searches for torrents from thepiratebay and displays the top results in reverse order, so the 1st result is at the bottom instead of the top -- which is better for command line users

Make changes in .bashrc immediately available

Show linux kernel modules dependencies
Use modprobe to list all the dependencies of a certain kernel module. Handy when debugging system issues.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Calculate N!
Same as the seq/bc solution but without bc.

Rename all files which contain the sub-string 'foo', replacing it with 'bar'
That is an alternative to command 8368. Command 8368 is EXTREMELY NOT clever. 1) Will break also for files with spaces AND new lines in them AND for an empty expansion of the glob '*' 2) For making such a simple task it uses two pipes, thus forking. 3) xargs(1) is dangerous (broken) when processing filenames that are not NUL-terminated. 4) ls shows you a representation of files. They are NOT file names (for simple names, they mostly happen to be equivalent). Do NOT try to parse it. Why? see this :http://mywiki.wooledge.org/ParsingLs Recursive version: $ find . -depth -name "*foo*" -exec bash -c 'for f; do base=${f##*/}; mv -- "$f" "${f%/*}/${base//foo/bar}"; done' _ {} +

Check syntax of remote ruby file

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

find all non-html files


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