Commands using df (48)

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Find the package that installed a command

looking for files not subversioned
En entornos de desarrollos muchas veces se mezclan ficheros y debemos revisar si algo se nos ha quedado fuera del proyecto. Con esta linea de comando busco todos los ficheros que no sean M ( modificados ) para valorar si tengo que agregarlo al repositorio de subversion. Adem?s siempre se me olvida como usar un condicional con awk para una columna :D

Retry the previous command until it exits successfully

Speed up launch of liferea
If you use liferea frequently, you will see obvious speedup after you executed this command.

Execute a command without saving it in the history
Prepending one or more spaces to your command won't be saved in history. Useful for pr0n or passwords on the commandline. Tested on BASH.

Show apps that use internet connection at the moment. (Multi-Language)
for one line per process: $ ss -p | cat for established sockets only: $ ss -p | grep STA for just process names: $ ss -p | cut -f2 -sd\" or $ ss -p | grep STA | cut -f2 -d\"

Which .service related this file?
I use this as an alias to get all .service files related a single installed file/conf (if it has services, of course). For rpm based systems ;)

Use Perl like grep
If you've ever tried "grep -P" you know how terrible it is. Even the man page describes it as "highly experimental". This function will let you 'grep' pipes and files using Perl syntax for regular expressions. The first argument is the pattern, e.g. '/foo/'. The second argument is a filename (optional).

get a process list by listen port

analyze traffic remotely over ssh w/ wireshark
Please check out my blog article on this for more detail. http://jdubb.net/blog/2009/08/07/monitor-wireshark-capture-real-time-on-remote-host-via-ssh/


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