Commands using dir (23)

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Create a PNG screenshot of Rigol Ultravision scopes attached per LAN
Scope should have the Rigol Ultravision Technology otherwise it won't accept the command. ImageMagic is required. Scope sends a 1.1M BMP file and converted to PNG it's only 18-20K

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Convert a file from ISO-8859-1 (or whatever) to UTF-8 (or whatever)
I use it sometimes when I work on a french file transferred from a windows XP to a Debian-UTF8 system. Those are not correctly displayed: ? ? ? and so on $man tcs # for all charsets

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

Number of commits per day in a git repository

Find passwords that has been stored as plain text in NetworkManager

Create a local compressed tarball from remote host directory
This improves on #9892 by compressing the directory on the remote machine so that the amount of data transferred over the network is much smaller. The command uses ssh(1) to get to a remote host, uses tar(1) to archive and compress a remote directory, prints the result to STDOUT, which is written to a local file. In other words, we are archiving and compressing a remote directory to our local box.

Rename files in batch

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

List symbols from a dynamic library (.so file)
You can get what functions at which addresses are inside a dynamic link library by this tool.


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