Commands using dmesg (14)

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Found how how much memory in kB $PID is occupying in Linux
The "proportional set size" is probably the closest representation of how much active memory a process is using in the Linux virtual memory stack. This number should also closely represent the %mem found in ps(1), htop(1), and other utilities.

PDF simplex to duplex merge
Joins two pdf documents coming from a simplex document feed scanner. Needs pdftk >1.44 w/ shuffle.

Generate SHA1 hash for each file in a list
List files and pass to openssl to calculate the hash for each file.

Get the IP address of a machine. Just the IP, no junk.
Why use many different utilities all piped together, when you only need two?

system beep off

Convert clipboard HTML content to markdown (for github, trello, etc)
I always wanted to be able to copy formatted HTML, like from emails, on trello cards or READMEs... but the formatting is always wrong... But from this two links: * https://jeremywsherman.com/blog/2012/02/08/pasting-html-into-markdown/ * http://stackoverflow.com/questions/3261379/getting-html-source-or-rich-text-from-the-x-clipboard For instance, to to copy an formatted email to a trello card, just: 1. Select the email body 2. run: xclip -selection clipboard -o -t text/html | pandoc -f html -t markdown_github - | xclip -i -t text/plain 3. Paste in your trello card 4. Profit! 8-)

Ensure that each machine that you log in to has its own history file
On systems where your home directory is shared across different machines, your bash history will be global, rather than being a separate history per machine. This setting in your .bashrc file will ensure that each machine has its own history file.

list files recursively by size

32 bits or 64 bits?
Easy and direct way to find this out.

Print random emoji in terminal
This will print a random emoji within the range of 1F600 - 1F64F, which includes all the face emoji. Obviously, this will only show something meaningful if your terminal can display emoji, but it may be useful in scripts. This likely requires recent versions of bash


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