Commands using echo (1,383)

  • Requires figlet. Other than that, this should be portable enough across all the Bourne-compatible shells (sh, bash, ksh, zsh, etc). Produces a massive number using figlet that counts down the number of seconds for any given minute interval. For example, here's a 4-minute timer: i=$((4*60)); while [ $i -gt 0 ]; do clear; echo $i | figlet; sleep 1; i=$(($i-1)); done; And a 1-minute timer: i=$((1*60)); while [ $i -gt 0 ]; do clear; echo $i | figlet; sleep 1; i=$(($i-1)); done; Show Sample Output


    1
    i=$((15*60)); while [ $i -gt 0 ]; do clear; echo $i | figlet; sleep 1; i=$(($i-1)); done;
    atoponce · 2010-06-22 17:49:36 1
  • Simple countdown clock that should be quite portable across any Bourne-compatible shell. I used to teach for a living, and I would run this code when it was time for a break. Usually, I would set "MIN" to 15 for a 15-minute break. The computer would be connected to a projector, so this would be projected on screen, front and center, for all to see. Show Sample Output


    11
    MIN=1 && for i in $(seq $(($MIN*60)) -1 1); do echo -n "$i, "; sleep 1; done; echo -e "\n\nBOOOM! Time to start."
    atoponce · 2010-06-20 15:19:12 2
  • Same as http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/5876, but for bash. This will show a numerical value for each of the 256 colors in bash. Everything in the command is a bash builtin, so it should run on any platform where bash is installed. Prints one color per line. If someone is interested in formatting the output, paste the alternative.


    45
    for code in {0..255}; do echo -e "\e[38;05;${code}m $code: Test"; done
    scribe · 2010-06-19 02:14:42 4
  • This command will automate the creation of ESSIDs and batch processing in pyrit. Give it a list of WPA/WPA2 access points you're targeting and it'll import those ESSIDs and pre-compute the potential password hashes for you, assuming you've got a list of passwords already imported using: pyrit -i dictionary import_passwords Once the command finishes, point pyrit to your packet capture containing a handshake with the attack_db module. Game over. Show Sample Output


    0
    gopyrit () { if [ $# -lt 1 ]; then echo $0 '< list of ESSIDs >'; return -1; fi; for i in "$@"; do pyrit -e $i create_essid && pyrit batch; done; pyrit eval }
    meathive · 2010-06-19 01:11:00 0
  • Same as below, but no quotes are necessary when twitting more than one word


    1
    tweet(){ update=$(echo $*); [ ${#update} -lt 141 ] && curl -su user:pass -d source=curl -d status="$update" http://twitter.com/statuses/update.xml ->/dev/null || echo $(( ${#update} - 140 )) too many characters >&2; }
    dfarre · 2010-06-18 09:26:24 0
  • Generates a random 8-character password that can be typed using only the left hand on a QWERTY keyboard. Useful to avoid taking your hand off of the mouse, especially if your username is left-handed. Change the 8 to your length of choice, add or remove characters from the list based on your preferences or kezboard layout, etc.


    6
    </dev/urandom tr -dc '12345!@#$%qwertQWERTasdfgASDFGzxcvbZXCVB' | head -c8; echo ""
    TexasDex · 2010-06-17 19:30:36 0
  • For this hack you need following function: finit() { count=$#; current=1; for i in "$@" ; do echo $current $count; echo $i; current=$((current + 1)); done; } and alias: alias fnext='read cur total && echo -n "[$cur/$total] " && read' Inspired by CMake progress counters. Show Sample Output


    2
    finit "1 2 3" 3 2 1 | while fnext i ; do echo $i; done;
    mechmind · 2010-06-17 10:20:49 0
  • Here's a version that uses netcat (although I'd much rather use curl!).


    -2
    echo -e "GET /ip HTTP/1.0\nUser-Agent: netcat\nHOST: ifconfig.me\n\n" | nc ifconfig.me 80 | sed -n '/^[0-9]/p'
    putnamhill · 2010-06-16 19:08:05 0

  • -2
    echo "alias sudo=\"aplay annoyingsoundfile.ogg\"" >> .bash_aliases
    Davidc3 · 2010-06-16 10:20:15 2
  • This is a simple solution to running a remote program on a remote computer on the remote display through ssh. 1. Create an empty 'commander' file in the directory where you intend on running these commands. 2. Run the command 3. Hop on another computer and ssh in to the PC where you ran the command 4. cd to the directory where the 'commander' file is. 5. Test it by doing the following: echo "xeyes" > commander 6. If it worked properly, then xeyes will popup on the remote computer. Combined with my other one liner, you can place those in some start-up scripts and be able to screw with your wife/daughter/siblings, w/e by either launching programs or sending notifications(my other one liner). Also, creates a log file named comm_log in working directory that logs all commands ran.


    0
    while :;do if [ ! $(ls -l commander |cut -d ' ' -f5) -eq 0 ]; then echo "Ran command: $(less commander) @ $(date +%D) $(date +%r)" >> comm_log;"$(less commander)";> commander;fi;done
    evil · 2010-06-15 01:20:27 1
  • One of the first functions programmers learn is how to print a line. This is my 100% bash builtin function to do it, which makes it as optimal as a function can be. The COLUMNS environment variable is also set by bash (including bash resetting its value when you resize your term) so its very efficient. I like pretty-output in my shells and have experimented with several ways to output a line the width of the screen using a minimal amount of code. This is like version 9,000 lol. This function is what I use, though when using colors or other terminal features I create separate functions that call this one, since this is the lowest level type of function. It might be better named printl(), but since I use it so much it's more optimal to have the name contain less chars (both for my programming and for the internal workings). If you do use terminal escapes this will reset to default. tput sgr0 For implementation ideas, check my http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html Show Sample Output


    2
    L(){ l=`builtin printf %${2:-$COLUMNS}s` && echo -e "${l// /${1:-=}}"; }
    AskApache · 2010-06-14 04:35:30 3
  • Plot your most used commands with gnuplot.


    14
    history | awk '{a[$2]++}END{for(i in a){print a[i] " " i}}' | sort -rn | head > /tmp/cmds | gnuplot -persist <(echo 'plot "/tmp/cmds" using 1:xticlabels(2) with boxes')
    sthrs · 2010-06-13 23:35:13 2

  • -2
    for i in 192.168.1.{1..254} ; do if ping -c1 -w1 $i &>/dev/null; then echo $i alive; fi; done
    wiburg · 2010-06-12 18:38:36 0
  • This one liner takes the shell code that you can grab off of the web and disassemble it into readable assembly so you can validate the code does what it says, before using it. The shell code in the above example is from http://www.shell-storm.org/shellcode/files/shellcode-623.php You can replace "-s intel" with "-s att" to get AT&T format disassembly. Show Sample Output


    13
    echo -ne "<shellcode>" | x86dis -e 0 -s intel
    dsearle · 2010-06-12 08:08:13 0

  • -4
    for /F %G in ('dir /b c:\Windows\system32\notepad.exe') do ( echo %G )
    eneko · 2010-06-11 21:28:36 1
  • This command remove a file from your filesystem like the normal rm command but instead of deleting only the inode information this also delete the data that was stored on blocks /!\ warning this may be long for large files Show Sample Output


    1
    function rrm(){ for i in $*; do; if [ -f $i ]; then; echo "rrm - Processing $i"; shred --force --remove --zero --verbose $i; else; echo "Can't process $i"; type=$(stat "$1" -c %F); echo "File $i is $type"; fi; done;}
    thelan · 2010-06-10 22:40:27 0
  • Converts the ascii text to hex from bash. Check the sample output. Show Sample Output


    1
    echo -n 'text' | xxd -ps | sed -e ':a' -e 's/\([0-9]\{2\}\|^\)\([0-9]\{2\}\)/\1\\x\2/;ta'
    sata · 2010-06-09 12:20:02 1
  • A shortcut to generate documentation with phpdoc. Defaults to HTML; optionally to PDF if third argument is given. Stores documentation in cwd under ./docs/. I forget the syntax to the output, -o, option, so this is easier.


    1
    gophpdoc() { if [ $# -lt 2 ]; then echo $0 '< file > < title > [ pdf ]'; return; fi; if [ "$3" == 'pdf' ]; then ot=PDF:default:default; else ot=HTML:frames:earthli; fi; phpdoc -o $ot -f "$1" -t docs -ti "$2" }
    meathive · 2010-06-09 01:15:04 0
  • Instead of having someone else read you the Digg headlines, Have OSX do it. Requires Curl+Sed+Say. This could probably be easily modified to use espeak for Linux.


    -2
    IFS=`echo -en "\n\b"`; for i in $(curl http://feeds.digg.com/digg/container/technology/popular.rss | grep '<title>' | sed -e 's#<[^>]*>##g' | tail -n10); do echo $i; echo $i | sed 's/^/Did you hear about /g' | say; sleep 30; done
    echosedawk · 2010-06-07 22:16:19 1
  • Whenever we are only interested in difference between two numbers and not the positive/negative values we can use this in script. Show Sample Output


    2
    abs_value=-1234; echo ${abs_value#-}
    prasadwani · 2010-06-07 14:30:47 0
  • You can also do this for seconds, minutes, hours, etc... Can't use dates before the epoch, though. Show Sample Output


    7
    echo $((($(date +%s)-$(date +%s -d "march 1"))/86400))
    recursiverse · 2010-06-04 21:41:07 0

  • -11
    echo "your text" > filename
    anjan · 2010-06-04 16:54:35 1

  • 2
    history | awk '{a[$'$(echo "1 2 $HISTTIMEFORMAT" | wc -w)']++}END{for(i in a){print a[i] " " i}}' | sort -rn | head
    mrcomputer · 2010-06-03 16:06:09 0
  • This renames a pattern matched bunch of files by their last modified time. rename by timestamp rename by time created rename by time modified Show Sample Output


    0
    for i in somefiles*.png ; do echo "$i" ; N=$(stat -c %Y $i); mv -i $i $N.png; done
    sufoo · 2010-06-01 19:28:05 0
  • add integers from the stdin and print out the result usually, cat /tmp/file | echo $(($(tr '\n' '+')0)) Show Sample Output


    1
    echo $(($(tr '\n' '+')0))
    whiskybar · 2010-06-01 18:42:39 0
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