Commands using egrep (214)

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ssh batch jobs: query hundreds of hosts with an ssh command
Need to query hundreds of hosts with an ssh command ? Of course you'll have setup keys on all your remote HOSTs. But in the case a key is not present this command will skip that node, proceeding on to the next. -t: Force pseudo-tty allocation. This can be used to execute arbitrary screen-based programs on a remote machine. Also prevents unwanted stty messages being sent to console -q: Quiet mode. -o "BatchMode yes" If set to yes, passphrase/password querying will be disabled. This option is useful in scripts and other batch jobs where no user is present

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

Cheap iftop
Shows updated status in a terminal window for connections to port '80' in a human-friendly form. Use 'watch -n1' to update every second, and 'watch -d' to highlight changes between updates. If you wish for status updates on a port other than '80', always remember to put a space afterwards so that ":80" will not match ":8080".

Quickly CD Out Of Directories Without 5+ Aliases
I wrote this a long time ago, wondering why this wasn't floating around somewhere out there (at least not where I could find).. this seems much more simple than multiple aliases and can cd out of directories easier.

if you are working in two different directories; e.g. verifying files in your home directory; ls ~/ and you need to cd to the /etc/directory. you can enter 'cd -' (no single quotes) to go back and forth between directories.

quit gvim remotely

find both total size and number of files below any given svn directory
afaik, svn doesn't have a good, scriptable way of telling you these two basic pieces of information.

Quick HTML image gallery
More compact and direct.

Blue Matrix
Same as original, but works in bash

Rename files in batch


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